Cheeseburger Gothic

US cover. Emergence

Posted 3 hours ago by John Birmingham

It's always interesting to see the difference between the various covers of my books. People do indeed judge books by their covers. Pan Macmillan strives to grab up the mass market thriller audience here. In America, the niches are so monstrously huge that you can target particular genres or sub genres and still make more money.

I love love love the US covers, but I can only show you the first here because the later artwork contains spoilers.

Would I change anything?

Just one tweak. Dave's murder axe should be a splitting maul. But that's a train spotter quibble. In terms of marketing, the axe works betterer because it's simpler.

5 Responses to ‘US cover. Emergence’

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Murphy ducks in to say...

Posted 2 hours ago
Has he got a handlebar, porno 1970s style mustache?

Held a splitting maul a month or so ago. Had a photo or two taken of me wielding it. No one will know the difference.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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dweeze mutters...

Posted 2 hours ago
train spotter or hair splitter? can you be both JB?
I love my splitter - it has had so many replacement handles and heads but, I swear, it is still the same unit. No, it was not my grandfather's.

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Murphy swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted 2 hours ago
John, if it makes you feel any better they put a pair of Harry Potter style glasses on my protag in Tearing Down Tuesday's interior illustration. Kyle doesn't wear glasses and probably more to the point, no one cares.
Well, except me. I cared, but it was a full color illustration. That helps one get over a lot with their first sale.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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w from brisbane would have you know...

Posted 1 hour ago
Dave......"overweight, balding"...."monster-slayer".

Oh man, JB. You know your readers and how to pander to their pathetic wish-fulfillment fantasies.
You are shameless! Shameless!

Quick, hurry. I need to read this book!

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Extract. A compulsion to Kill, by Robert Cox

Posted 22 hours ago into Book Extract by John Birmingham

An interesting history of Australia's early serial killers. I used to have a theory that the increasing number of serial killers was somehow related to the metastisizing of material culture. Probably because I read too much Bret Easton Ellis.

Anyway, I was asked to look at a manuscript by Robert Cox, for A Compulsion to Kill. A history of early serial killers. I used to find these sort of books really useful when researching Leviathan. Often more useful than general historical texts.

In the meantime, armed parties were scouring the district for Haley. On Monday 18 February, the night after Wilson’s murder, he was seen at Fort William, on the east coast. The next night he went to the hut of a family named Power, with whom he had previously been friendly, on Steele’s estate at Falmouth, on the coast about ten kilometres from St Marys. Power was absent but his wife and children were at home. After assuring them he meant them no harm, Haley stole a double-barrel shotgun and left. Later he stole another firearm from the house of a man named Struchneide. On the afternoon of Thursday 21st he called at Sawyer’s hut on Steele’s estate and asked for food and ammunition, saying he had been sorely pressed by the police. He swore to Sawyer’s wife that rather than be captured, he would shoot everyone that came his way. Ten minutes after leaving the hut he was spotted by police constables Greenhalf and Livesay. He was about 300 metres from them and caught sight of them as they were crossing a brush fence to pursue him. He began to run. The police gave chase, calling on him to stop. He kept running, so Greenhalf fired at him from about seventy metres away. Haley appeared to stagger as if wounded but turned and fired back, his shot hitting Greenhalf’s finger. Livesay then fired at Haley without effect. Haley now jettisoned his coat, hat, and firearms and escaped into thick bush. Hearing the shots, Chief District Constable Smith and several volunteers rushed to the scene, but the bush was so thick they could not find the fugitive.


Next morning a woman saw Haley passing through a wheat field. When the field was examined, evidence was found that he had spent the night there. Blood traces showed he was wounded. That afternoon he held up another hut, taking clothes and enough food for a week. On Tuesday 26 February he robbed John Hyman’s hut.


Despite the number of armed men searching for Haley, three days passed without sight of him. Then, on the afternoon of Friday 1 March, eleven days after Wilson’s murder, the fugitive went to John Galty’s property at Cullenswood and approached a hut there. He identified himself to an old man working nearby and told him he was starving. The man offered Haley some tobacco and kept him talking until two men at work not far away noticed what was happening and rushed to raise the alarm at Galty’s. Supported by several reapers, Galty approached Haley and the old man, but, as they got close, Haley darted into some scrub and squatted under a honeysuckle log. As Galty and the reapers passed by without seeing him, he stood up and cried out ‘Here I am!’, whereupon Galty seized him. Haley was unarmed and had a gunshot wound in the arm, inflicted by Constable Greenhalf a few days before. The capture was at Mt Nicholas, between Fingal and St Marys.
Chief District Constable Smith, who had been nearby supervising police search parties, when told of Haley’s whereabouts, soon arrived. He took the fugitive into custody and conveyed him to the Fingal jail where Haley confessed to killing Thomas Wilson, blaming drunkenness, but denied killing Julia Mulholland. Hobart’s Mercury newspaper cryptically reported that ‘With reference to the murder of Mrs Mulholland there is some reason to believe that he had a felonious intent besides murder’.


As a result of the manhunt, the tragic widower Peter Mulholland’s woes were compounded. Sworn in as a special constable, he had armed himself with a shotgun and joined the search for Haley. On the morning after the fugitive’s capture, Mulholland sought to unload the gun by firing it but the overloaded weapon exploded, shattering his left hand. ‘So complete was the destruction,’ a newspaper noted, ‘that three of the fingers and other portions of the limb were scattered about the ground in different directions.’ A doctor was summoned, but at midnight the arm had to be amputated.

On 11 March Haley was examined before Police Magistrate J.P. Stuart at Fingal court house. He continued to deny all participation in the bloodbath at the Mulhollands’, although he professed to know who the culprit was. His attitude was defiant. The Mercury reported that although at first ‘his usual tiger like and murderous ferocity appeared somewhat subdued’, he soon ‘presented the same brazen defiance, the same cool indifference, as before. He passed the woman he has made a widow [who had survived his attack] and the child he has made an orphan without a blush or a bend of the head ... and as his examination proceeded he browbeat the witnesses and bullied the police magistrate.’


During testimony by John Evans, who had been working in a paddock only 100 metres from the Mulhollands’ on the Saturday of the first murder, Haley constantly interrupted and made threats against him. When Evans gave evidence that Julia Mulholland had later approached him and ‘asked if [Haley] was gone away from her place ... she seemed very sad and downhearted; I had never seen her so before’, Haley became so enraged that several constables were needed to restrain him. In a furious outburst that lasted more than ten minutes, he swore he would tear Evans open and eat his heart.


‘During the whole examination,’ the Cornwall Chronicle observed, ‘he exhibited the most demoniacal hatred to the witnesses, and on his removal gave further proof of what a reckless villain he is. He seemed to regret his inability to commit more murders.’

Haley faced the Supreme Court in Launceston on Tuesday 30 April 1861, with the Chief Justice, Sir Valentine Fleming, on the bench. The charge was murdering Thomas Wilson, to which the usually talkative Haley pleaded guilty in a low mumble, adding that he had nothing else to say. The Chief Justice did, however. He already knew Haley, having sentenced him at Oatlands in 1856 to six years’ jail for the assault and attempted robbery of William Humphries. Next day, when Haley was brought up into the crowded courtroom for sentence, Fleming observed that the prisoner’s record evidenced his ‘ungovernable passion which seems to have overpowered all reason and every sentiment of humanity’, noting that in 1856 Haley had been convicted of ‘unlawfully and maliciously wounding a fellow creature [Humphries]’. He said Haley had a ‘fearful history of merciless vengeance and reckless brutality’ and ‘had outraged all laws, human and divine’. After urging him to pray for divine mercy, Fleming sentenced him to be taken to the place ‘from whence he came’, there to be hanged and dissected.

The doomed man for the first time seemed bewildered, and turned to the left and then to the right, as if he did not know his way to the place ‘from whence he came.’

He was then escorted out.

On Haley’s removal from the Supreme Court to the Gaol ... on the officer in charge proceeding to handcuff him to another prisoner ... Haley offered the hand which had lost a thumb, and from which he could have easily slipped the handcuff. This, however, was refused, and the handcuff was placed upon the other wrist. On his arrival at the Gaol, Haley, according to custom, was put in irons, and he evinced considerable stubbornness at being subjected to such a proceeding.

Three weeks later, before he was taken from his cell for execution, Haley eased his conscience by admitting that he had indeed slain Julia Mulholland as well as Thomas Wilson. Then he shocked officials by confessing that he had also murdered a woman named Mary Stack near Cleveland nearly three years earlier—an unsolved crime he had never been suspected of.
She was his first known murder victim.

2 Responses to ‘Extract. A compulsion to Kill, by Robert Cox’

S.M. Stirling would have you know...

Posted 3 hours ago
Serial killers need anonymity and mobility. The impulses have always been there, but most people have always lived in pretty much the same place, or if they move its through a place -like- that, with alert eyes on them all the time.

Only recently have they had good hunting grounds.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted 2 hours ago
Interesting. Mobile killers or mobile victims. H. H. Holmes wasn't mobile during the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. But 27 million people flooded into Chicago, providing him with endless potential victims.

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The Navigator

Posted Yesterday into Politics by John Birmingham

So much written this week about the mythologizing of hte Gough Whitlam. Most of it on the Right, moaning about the Left. Greg Sheridan's column on Thursday was an example of the form. But in fact a lot of the Whitlam myth was manufactured on the Right. In hindsight his economic policies, especially in the era of OPEC driven catastrophe can be seen as unremarkable and the call his government made on the public purse was significantly less than that of economically dry John Howard.

Another element of myth making which plays such a large part in US politcs, but almost none here, is war service. Whitlam flew with the RAAF in WW2, but rarely made anything of it. I wrote todays column to remind everyone, Greg Sheridan included, of that service.

Illo by Glen Le Lievre from the SMH.

For three years Gough Whitlam risked his life climbing into the sky where other men wanted to kill him. He fought against the Japanese as a navigator and bomb aimer with the RAAF's Number 13 Squadron, which flew slow, under-armed Bristol Beauforts and later the American-made Lockheed Venturas as long-range maritime strike aircraft.

Perhaps, like Keith Miller, the test cricketer and fellow air force veteran who famously scoffed at the idea of there being any real pressure in sport – "pressure is a Messerschmitt up your arse" – Whitlam took some perspective from those years.

A vast right-wing conspiracy might have wanted to destroy him and his government, but at least they weren't actively trying to kill him.

Read more.


10 Responses to ‘The Navigator’

Zombie_Balzac has opinions thus...

Posted Yesterday
Nice article, fkn awful comments. Bebe and Flanders must set their alarms on a Saturday to get in first. Never a countering fact or logical argument, no history, just trolling. Always swilling and serving the Murdoch Kool-Aid. Never mind the High Commissioner's post - I wonder how our history might be different if Rupe had snuffed it pre-Thatcher. Now there's an alt-history that might be less dystopic.

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MickH puts forth...

Posted Yesterday
Ironically, my memories of Whitlam as a kid were polerized by my father, a serving RAAF member at the time, who despised him.

'With defence cuts under the Whitlam Government, No 76 Squadron was disbanded amongst much ill feeling in August 1973.'

The RAAF at the time hated his guts!

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Halwes reckons...

Posted Yesterday

We held a wake for Gough last night at the pub. It brought back some great memories of Australia before and after him. I lived in a working class area of the western suburbs of Sydney for a time and there wouldn't have been many women in our street that didn't get bashed by their husbands at least once. Domestic violence and male dominance was something we took for granted. Women were imprisoned because of no single parent support, no refuges, no family court and no no fault divorces. Whitlam championed all these causes and caused me, for the first time, to question the status quo. I am incredibly proud of the achievements of the left. None of the rank and file made much money but we did make a difference to the lives of our fellow human beings and were roundly criticised for it. I learnt that, if the liberals hate you, then you can't be all bad. If you can't hold your head up you can never be free and so many of the 60's era women were so downtrodden for so long that it seemed impossible that many of them would be able to hold their heads up ever again. RIP Gough. Loved your work mate.

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Barnesm reckons...

Posted Yesterday
<font color="#333333">I saw the Greg Sheridan's article, useful to remember how long the right have hated what was accomplished in the Whitlam governments three years. It took them and labor thirty to wind many of them back. </font>

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zoot mutters...

Posted Yesterday
John, you've outdone yourself. This is the best tribute to Gough I have read.

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insomniac would have you know...

Posted 23 hours ago
Ms insomniac lived in Gough's electorate. Her father loved him; her mother hated him. She has fallen on the side of good.
Gough was certainly ahead of his time. Tiny Abbott is sending us back.
On the Guardian someone mentioned a tweet to the effect of: Both Gough and Tony have dragged Australia into the 20th century.

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BigWillieStyle reckons...

Posted 21 hours ago
I grew up hating Gough, for no other reason than I knew fuck-all about politics, and both my parents were as loudly and aggressively staunch Tories as it's possible to be. When I acquired a brain of my own, and read about the reforms that Gough brought about, I was instantly smitten. I still am. His brief but exciting PMship begs the question: just what the fuck was Menzies actually doing for his 17 years? And more to the point, why did people keep voting for him? Straya must have been quite the backwater back then. As opposed to now. * coughs *

EGW's death also provides a stark and gloomy reminder of what a bunch of ideological piss-ants we've got now. Not one of our current Federal MPs would be capable of wiping Gough's arse. Feeble-minded, insular hacks, every motherfucking last one of them.

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damian would have you know...

Posted 20 hours ago
You had me at "punishers and straighteners and champions of the overdog". Very Manning Clark, but anyway nicely done.

I've no particular view on the Greens using images of Gough and talking to their part in furthering the progressive tradition. Personally I came from the Whitlam tradition, grew up in it and identify with it strongly, though I abandoned the ALP for the Greens decades ago. So I have no patience at all for ALP folks complaint about the Greens identifying with that legacy. It's almost the last straw for the ALP for me - exactly what's wrong with them, tribal nonsense ("get lost, he's OURS you protest party types") and everything. Fuck that bullshit.

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ShaneAlpha is gonna tell you...

Posted 3 hours ago
I found it funny that in one of Sith Lord Rupert's rags there was a story about the friendship that developed between Fraser and Whitlam later in life. In the article a comment was made that they had both become disillusioned about their respective parties as Labour moved to the right and the Liberals moved to the far right.

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@DrWom reckons...

Posted 3 hours ago
Thanks JB

Gough was the greatest PM ever.

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When too much Cthulhu is barely enough

Posted Friday into Books by John Birmingham

Open Culture has kindly gathered up all the free HP Lovecraft audio books in existence and bundled them in one terrorlicious post for you download at your convenience.

How many Lovecraft works? Pretty much all of them. The stories have slipped into the public domain and mad fans of the Olde Ones have been recording their own versions. There are also professional readings of everything from The Call of Cthulu to The Dunwich Horror, and a radio dramatization of The Color out of Space.

All the good free stuff is here.

From Open Culture:

The early twentieth century author spent almost his entire life in the New England of his birth, drawing on its many oddities in obscure stories published in pulp magazines—notably the influential Weird Tales. Hypochondriac, hyper-sensitive, and reclusive in later life, Lovecraft survived on a dwindling inheritance and never achieved much recognition. But in death, he has spawned a formidable cult who immerse themselves in a universe created from references to the occult, demonology, and various mythological archetypes. However overwrought his prose, Lovecraft’s work can be situated in a long literary tradition of influence, and a Lovecraft circle continued to expand his vision of scientific and supernatural horror after his death... Listening to Lovecraft is an excellent, as well as convenient, way to experience his work. His florid, often archaic, and melodramatic descriptions lend themselves perfectly to aural interpretations.

10 Responses to ‘When too much Cthulhu is barely enough’

Chaz ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
Nice retro feel listening to cthulhugoodness

Anthony has opinions thus...

Posted Friday

Surely you mean Cthulubadness?

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Surtac puts forth...

Posted Friday
Cthulu as audio is teh awesome.

Were you folks not aware of HPPodcraft.com? Do yourselves a favour.

Barnesm mutters...

Posted Friday
Thanks for that Surtac I perfer my audiobooks to be ipodable.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted Saturday
If you don't tell your children about C'thulhu, they will learn about C'thulhu on the street, or the locker room, or from other disreputable sources.

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Zombie_Balzac is gonna tell you...

Posted Yesterday
I'm going to make myself a target here maybe and say that Lovecraft's literary descendants and pastiche makers are actually a heck of a lot better than the man himself. I find Charles Stross' Laundry Files great fun while HP's stuff is as turgid and repetitive as it is morbid. No denying his influence though. Hellboy FTW.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan would have you know...

Posted Yesterday
We all agree with you, more or less. But HP was the source, and there is something pure about his stuff, even if it is a bit clumsy.

I enjoy Robert E. Howard for the same reasons.

Zombie_Balzac would have you know...

Posted Yesterday
I agree, including the guilty (in my case) enjoyment of Robert E Howard. When authors with more modern attitudes took over from Howard, the stories just weren't the same. Thoughtful and considerate Conan? Give me sorcerers, monsters, giant apes to cleave and princesses to rescue. And blood, lots of blood.

I'll just go and lie down now.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan ducks in to say...

Posted Yesterday
When I was 13 years old Howard's works inspired me to write one of my first short stories entitled Larry the Barbarian. It was about a barbarian who got no respect from other barbarians because his name is Larry.

How I yearn for those simple days - when everything and everyone was simple.

Sudragon swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted 15 hours ago
I like the Laundry Files stories... It's funny, funny, spy stuff, funny, then the blood hits the walls and you want to stop reading as part of your brain gibbers in the corner.

Arguments could be made about connections between IS(IL)(IS) and CASE NIGHTMARE GREEN.

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The return of the typewriter (Updated)

Posted Friday into Writing by John Birmingham

My first real writing machine - the first rig I paid for with my own hard earned bucks - was a Sharp Intelliwriter 2000. I paid two hundred bucks for it at Monty's Pawn and Loan, down the Valley. I had a small screen about the size of my little finger and 4K of memory. I may have waxed lyrical about it before.

I ditched that sucker as soon as I could afford a 'real' computer, of course; some beige box DOS atrocity with two floopy drives and a green screen. Cost ten times as much as the Sharp.

These days, of course, I work in at the fruit factory. When the next round of book advances start flowing, after I've paid my tax (*whispers* - they read this blog), I'm probably gonna grab one of those sweet ass new retina 5K iMacs.

Which is why I can't believe I'm thinking of backing/buying this clunky monstrosity too.

The Hemingwrite. A digital typewriter.

And that's all it is. Well, sorry, it has some nifty connectivity built in, so as you can back up your heart breaking work of motherfucking genius to the cloud, or something.

But mostly it's about recreating the feel of an old school typerwriter. From the site:

The Hemingwrite provides the distraction free environment people crave while also giving them a familiar keyboard and a robust digital experience. People don’t have to fuss with ribbons, jammed hammers or spilling coffee on their manuscript anymore. The Hemingwrite will help you put words on a page better than any other tool ever made. And with constant backups to the cloud, you never have to worry about losing your work.

I like it because it reminds me of my original writing dream, to live in a small Mexican seaside village, in a fishing shack, with my beautiful but enigmatic Japanese house girl, Miko. My old typewriter would start up in the afternoon like gun fire in a bad neighborhood. I would punch out the words for a few hours before strolling into town where there would be tequila and knife fights and a reasonably priced taco.

I feel somehow that the Hemingwrite might deliver on this promise where life itself did not.

Update.

Having settled on my purchase, it took only one tweet from Mister Charles Stross to turn my head towards the even more retro-futurist Qwerkywriter, which he recommends using with Scrivener to reach 'writerly nirvana'.

This! This looks exactly like the typewriter of my imagination, down in the seaside shack with Miko and all the tequila.

24 Responses to ‘The return of the typewriter (Updated)’

Zombie_Balzac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Friday
Brain reeling. Does it have a little speaker to make incessant, hangover-unfriendly "Clack Clack" noises? A lever on top for an enter key/carriage return? A randomised "stop working because the keys or ribbon jammed again" feature? That's not a typewriter, it's a Word Processor, from when that meant a device, not software. 'Tis an abomination, neither fish nor fowl, a veritable platypus of word recording thingummies.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted Friday
I love this kind of nostalgia. I want a Hemingwrite for the same reason I sometimes yearn for the smell of ditto machine solvent and the perverse artistry inherent in White Out. Every now and then I pull out my old Underwood No. 5 (circa 1920) just to reconnect with an ancient time when keyboards were designed to slow secretaries down because fast typing jammed metal strike keys.

Oh my god, what have we done.

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Murphy asserts...

Posted Friday
I loved everything about the Panasonic electric typewriter I bought in Korea save one thing.

Dealing with the paper.

This thing? I can see buying one.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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insomniac mutters...

Posted Friday
Isn't that what the bunnies are for - transcribing your dictation?

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w from brisbane mutters...

Posted Friday
Crouched over the device, peering at the small low screen for hour after hour, it has the look of a device that would not be back, shoulder and neck friendly.

Lulu has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
Never mind the small screen - those keys are all blank.

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Rob has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
I thought you dictated your words to your apple box? and thus your dream should be , living on an estate in Hawaii, with an English manservant, two dobermans and you lend your Ferrari to a moustachioed Private Investigator who lives in the guest house and uses your pool free of charge because he saved your life?

Zombie_Balzac is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
NBlob has been likened to Magnum PI, admittedly only by those of poor eyesight and memory. But perhaps he could live in the guest house and trade as Cornetto PI?

NBlob is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
Given my current state of finances, it'd be more like Black & Gold fruit flavoured icy pole PI.

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John Hampshire ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
Forget the crappy ergonomics, forget the endless distraction of Twitter, the siren lure of the possibilities intrinsic to a 27" HD screen -- THIS is what I need to actually get the writing done!

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spankee mutters...

Posted Friday
I have a Remington Portable #2. I would love to use it, but I seriously do not know what for.

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Simon reckons...

Posted Friday
Does the qwerkywriter come with a set of ye olde flying goggles and a blunderbuss that is hooked up to a steam backpack to shoot rapid fire missiles?

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Therbs ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
But the iPad Air 2 is out!

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yankeedog mumbles...

Posted Friday
That Qwerkywriter is awesome! I want one-and I don't even really write anything. And Simon's right-that thing has a nice steampunky look about it.

dweeze mumbles...

Posted Friday
Prototype looks way cool. However, they won't be ready until mid 2015 at best. Kind of ass about back to the future thing. Oh, and they got hoverboards now...

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Naut mumbles...

Posted Friday
The keys off old typewriters make great cufflinks.

Zombie_Balzac mumbles...

Posted Friday
Philistine!

Bunyip asserts...

Posted Friday
Yes ZB, but he's a rather dashing and stylish Philistine.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted Friday
I am forced to agree with that.

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Blarkon puts forth...

Posted Friday
Is this one of those "I'm sure I'd always hit my deadline and need minimal copy edits and would never ever farking procrastinate if I just had the perfect writing tools" things?

Saw a guy who had a setup like the one in Gilliam's Brazil once. Dunno if he actually got shit done. But it looked nice.

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MickH would have you know...

Posted Friday
Seems like a backward step myself. Stick to dragon! :P

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ShaneAlpha has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
Surely you'll also be releasing the roneograph version of this blog to coincide with this back to the future writers vision?

Remember the roneograph! Getting school children high on toner for over 50 years.

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Sparty mutters...

Posted Friday
E-ink screen is very attractive - being able to write in full sun- oh yeah

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Post Human robot wars

Posted Friday into Movies by John Birmingham

Nice catch by Professor Boylan. A beautifully produced short about robots fighting our wars after we've been annihilated by robots fighting our wars.

Deets at iO9.

10 Responses to ‘Post Human robot wars’

Murphy asserts...

Posted Friday
Wow.

Just makes you want to see more of it.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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w from brisbane puts forth...

Posted Friday
Great to look at; the design, the detail and movement.
I am not visually creative. Having that ability must be quite thrilling at times

Bunyip reckons...

Posted Friday
I must say, I too was rather impressed by his design approach for both of the aircraft.

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NBlob reckons...

Posted Friday
Oh man that is Teh Shiznit.
10/10 & an wombat stamp.

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@simongarlick reckons...

Posted Friday
Reminds me of a short story I read as a child, title and author now faded in my memory. Nicholas Fisk maybe?

tk428 is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
Same. About an automated bomber being refilled at an automated base

And similar to Ray Bradbury's - There will come soft rains

Nicely done film though

Nocturnalist reckons...

Posted Friday
Bertrand Russell's Nightmares of Eminent Persons had a story in it that sounds similar.

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DNABeast swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Friday
I could easily watch another 20 minutes of that.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
I'll try to contact the writer/director and find out if the world can expect a little more.

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Chaz asserts...

Posted Friday

excellent, simply excellent.

of course if Lockheed Martins plans for portable fusion plants become reality so might this.....


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