Cheeseburger Gothic

NASA has a soundcloud page

Posted 4 hours ago by John Birmingham

And it's awesome.

You can listen to mission chatter in the background while you work, or just the eerie wailing of the space between the stars.

3 Responses to ‘NASA has a soundcloud page’

Barnesm reckons...

Posted 4 hours ago

The live stream from the International Space Station is also great to have as a minimised window while I am working on the 'puter late at night. Though I swear you can hear some staticy comments which If you aren't listening closely your mind can interpret in weird ways

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Lobes swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted 1 hour ago
I thought that in space nobody can hear you stream?

dweeze ducks in to say...

Posted 4 minutes ago
Or is it just pissing in the solar wind?

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Hysterical Victorian girl fits about ISIS

Posted 24 hours ago into Politics by John Birmingham

Hat tip to Guru Bob for sending me this link about the invincible jihadi juggernaut that ISn't. I've long thought ISIS to be a bunch of murderous clowns who would fall apart in the face of a discilplined military outfit. Luckily for them, all they're facing in Iraq is the Iraqi army, and in Syria, more murderous clowns. Unluckily for them, they ran into the magnificent Kurds.

KUWAIT CITY — A strange thing happened in Kobane, the Kurdish border town besieged by Islamic State: It didn’t fall.

In fact, today the BBC reported that Islamic State, the supposedly invincible jihadis who have been besieging Kobane, is retreating from the city.

Nobody expected that. Well, nobody except me. I’ve been saying for a long time that IS(IS) was the most overhyped military force on the planet, and that IS has been attacking Kobane for fifteen months—fifteen damn months—without success, which might just sort of suggest it’s not the juggernaut it’s been made out to be, and that IS’s other supposedly scary advance toward Baghdad is no more than a sad attempt to recover some of the Sunni suburbs of the capital the Sunni controlled completely less than a decade ago.

But I learned a long time ago you don’t get rich being right in this business, so I wasn’t surprised to be all alone yelling “Paper Tiger!” at IS while all the Lexus-driving pundits went into hysterical Victorian-girl fits on TV.

More

15 Responses to ‘Hysterical Victorian girl fits about ISIS’

insomniac mumbles...

Posted 23 hours ago
With that kid in the video yesterday, was he radicalised first and then travelled to Syria/Iraq, or is he just a misled misinformed dickhead who travelled to Syria/Iraq who then became radicalised? If it's the latter, how could you possibly spot them and prevent anything?

Halwes mumbles...

Posted 5 hours ago

i'm tired of arabs and their sectarian shit but I've travelled extensively through these countries and get it a little bit. I don't agree with it but I get it. Imagine you are an aussie kid living in Europe. You look back to aus and aus is being torn apart by a civil war with, what appears to you, a definite good guy and a really bad guy in the leadership roles. You're young and full of bravado and fervent faith in an imaginary friend. What would you do? I'm pretty sure I know what I'd want to do. Unfortunately, some young arabs brought up in the west, haven't had mature enough thought processes to understand that these places are shit for a reason and are ripe for radicalisation. These countries are shit because of greed, patriarchy, western exploitation, laziness, corruption, sectarianism, ancient hatreds, you name it, they've got it. Until some of that is addressed, these countries will always be shit.

yankeedog mumbles...

Posted 2 hours ago
I don't know you from Adam, Halwes, but you win the internet today.

That is the most correct assessment of the Middle East and a lot of the people living there that I've had the pleasure to read. Your statement should be on a paper and put in front of any national leader, statesman, and military officer as required reading.

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Cranky Peanut asserts...

Posted 23 hours ago
Thanks for this JB. Daeshi deadshits appear to be dumber than I thought. Good.

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Spanner mumbles...

Posted 22 hours ago
I assumed that the guys walking along behind the T55 were Daesh. Nope they are Kurds. Not sure how they can walk as they must have testicles the size of bowling balls.

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TheWah has opinions thus...

Posted 19 hours ago
Anyone else remember the indestructible juggernauts known as the Iraqi Republican Guard? I remember the media wetting its pants about these elite troops just before Desert Storm. They turned out to be mainly uni students in shiny uniforms, and they died or deserted.
I'm not all that up on my military, especially compared with many of the Burgers on here, but I am sure that a massively well equipped and funded professional military, such as owned by the US, isn't all that fearful of Daesh, and neither should we.

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TeamAmerica ducks in to say...

Posted 17 hours ago
I dunno, JB. After following your link, after previously reading this: http://ricochet.com/caveat-lector-news-kobani/
I am still not sure what's up in Kobane.

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Maddoug asserts...

Posted 14 hours ago
Quite a surprise to see one of the Kurds carrying a Steyr AUG! Wonder if it was one of ours?

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TeamAmerica is gonna tell you...

Posted 9 hours ago
Canadian jihadists appear to be responding to ISIS' cals to target the West:
http://ricochet.com/canada-under-attack/

TeamAmerica has opinions thus...

Posted 8 hours ago
'cals' should've been calls. Also, a would be jihadi ran over two Canadian soldiers yesterday, injuring one and killing the other.

Barnesm asserts...

Posted 8 hours ago
No I like to think the Daesh have everything organised based on name. All the Cals in Daesh have orders to run people over, the Donalds will be blowing themselves up and any Phils will be on beheading duty.

Cranky Peanut ducks in to say...

Posted 2 hours ago
Simplifies things. I hope they've let Bruce be in charge of the sheep dip.

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Wolf mutters...

Posted 4 hours ago
and if ... "it explodes as that RPG round sends superheated molten metal spraying through it as droplets of the MBT armor now zip into the crew compartment at the speed of detonating TNT, as the blast knocks the turret half-off and turns anyone inside to instant bulgoki."... isn't a Birmo worthy sentence, then nothing is.

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Rob mutters...

Posted 3 hours ago
Obviously those IS clowns haven't played enough Battlefield 3 or Call of Duty. I mean , just look at them strolling around like its a poorly attended all ages gig at youth club. And no helmets or flak jackets. Seriously no wonder they can't do any damage to a well defended position. You know one where the Kurds might actually aim at heads and disco clowns.

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How to drink

Posted Tuesday into Lunch Time Video by John Birmingham

W from Brisneyland sent me this video, which I found rather droll. It is not safe for work.

15 Responses to ‘How to drink’

HAVOCK21 swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Tuesday
ROF FKN LMAO!... ITS NOT A FKN INTERNET CAFE!.....FKN GOLD!

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Bangar is gonna tell you...

Posted Tuesday
I'm Bangar and I approve this message.

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Dave W ducks in to say...

Posted Yesterday
I think we just saw Havock's fkn doppelganger.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan ducks in to say...

Posted Yesterday
I found that video deeply disturbing. Fuck that guy. He can't tell me what to do. I like the sound of women laughing.

insomniac reckons...

Posted Yesterday
laughing with you or at you?

w from brisbane mutters...

Posted Yesterday
I had no idea there was such a thing as a blackberry margarita.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan is gonna tell you...

Posted Yesterday
There is such a thing as a blackberry margarita, and it is fabulous, although I could do without the seeds.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted Yesterday
They get stuck in my perfect teeth and ruin my charming smile.

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Bondiboy66 mumbles...

Posted Yesterday
LIKE

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Murphy asserts...

Posted Yesterday
I'm a fan of their shoes.

Besides, you don't order water with your drink.

You order iced tea. Fucking idiots. Sheesh.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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ShaneAlpha asserts...

Posted Yesterday
Don't forget to watch their equally hilarious how to pick up chicks.

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Legless reckons...

Posted 22 hours ago
How did you manage to get a video of me? And why do I have a beard?

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TheWah asserts...

Posted 19 hours ago
I honestly don't know what this ad/sketch is trying to say. If you follow the edicts set down by this loud mouth then everyone in the bar has a bad night. Look at the punters around him. Everyone of them looks miserable. I'm surprised the last rule of drinking wasn't "Stop being a douche and let people enjoy themselves as they see fit".

w from brisbane puts forth...

Posted 18 hours ago
"I honestly don't know what the ad/sketch is trying to say."

Dear TheWah,
Let me try to explain, from a semi-retired barfly's perspective.

While it is a piece of comic exaggeration, it is making some reasonable points. It is really about being respectful and considerate.

The 'make a triangle' advice is exactly right. The seating arrangements should be inclusive. No one should feel ostracised.

The general drink ordering stuff is really referring to when it is crowded. When the bar is quiet, feel free to treat the bar person as your personal drink consultant. But when it is busy and a lot of people are just wanting for a quick drink under some time pressure; then know your drink and keep it simple, until the crowd thins out.

The women laughing thing is weird, meant to be provocative I suppose. All laughter is welcome, except for the sadistic laughter of your torturer, I suppose. But, people in quiet bars who talk unnecessarily loudly are annoying. Just like people on the bus or the train who think their conversation is so awesome the whole carriage should hear. It isn't, particularly if it is full of vulgarisms. Don't shout.

So it is really about being respectful and considerate.

Needless to say, order a water or a wine if that is your preference. I do both regularly. But ,I think, the clip is a humourously exaggerated way of making some fair points.



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Siri on the autism spectrum

Posted Monday into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

Really lovely article in the Herald (originally NYT) about a mother's discovery of her autistic son's burgeoning friendship with Siri. She makes the point that her boy might have grown close to any AI, and investigates some of the potential for software 'sidekicks' to help integrate those growing up on 'the spectrum'.

But whether Siri or Cortana or el Goog, it's a lovely piece.

Gus had never noticed Siri before, but when he discovered there was someone who would not just find information on his various obsessions (trains, planes, buses, escalators and, of course, anything related to weather) but actually semi-discuss these subjects tirelessly, he was hooked. And I was grateful. Now, when my head was about to explode if I had to have another conversation about the chance of tornadoes in Kansas City, Missouri, I could reply brightly: "Hey! Why don't you ask Siri?"

It's not that Gus doesn't understand Siri's not human. He does - intellectually. But like many autistic people I know, Gus feels that inanimate objects, while maybe not possessing souls, are worthy of our consideration. I realised this when he was 8, and I got him an iPod for his birthday. He listened to it only at home, with one exception. It always came with us on our visits to the Apple Store. Finally, I asked why. "So it can visit its friends," he said.

32 Responses to ‘Siri on the autism spectrum’

Therbs ducks in to say...

Posted Monday
That last paragraph. Wonderful.

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Barnesm mutters...

Posted Monday
I do wonder what friends it will make. The movie 'Her' suggests with simulated intelligences we may become very fond of these friends finding them much more patient, reasonable and undemanding than our human friends.

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Bunyip is gonna tell you...

Posted Monday
Oh. That was gorgeous.
Ta muchly JB.

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Dave W swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Monday
I know who I'd ask about tornadoes in K.C.. Just sayin'.

Respects.
Outer marches etc etc.

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Zombie_Balzac ducks in to say...

Posted Monday
That was a great read. You wouldn't think with something so positive that the "don't read the comments" rule would apply, but yeah.

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NBlob reckons...

Posted Monday
+1, a nice yarn.

Human relationships are hard. Especially for young men. There seems a trend of people disengaging from human-human interactions. People will always vere away from the distasteful and difficult. Less experience leads to even more difficulty, more hesitance, more avoidance.
Programming continues to produce user interfaces that are more intuitive, more personable.
What will happen to us when these trends intersect?

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Murphy reckons...

Posted Monday
First, I think the parent is a shit for not having the conversation with the kid anyway and throwing it off to a piece of technology. It sounds like the sort of thing my parents might have done. Besides, one can have a far more productive conversation with Google's app than with Siri.

In relation to tornadoes, I've lived in the Midwest for most of my life. The gaps in habitation can be narrowed down to five months during the Gulf War and eleven months in South Korea. Throw in four to five more months for Basic and AIT in South Carolina/Georgia respectively.
So, I have never actually seen a tornado. The closest I have been to one is a particularly nasty storm which hit the area back in 2003 I believe. It is the one time I sat in a bathtub with a book since I lived in a brick, cockroach infested apartment building. I didn't realize it but apparently the tornado cell had passed over North Kansas City and landed in Kansas City North (further north), destroying a brand new housing development which included the just finished home of KMBC 9 News Anchor Kris Ketz.

We have storms. Just like everyone else does. We don't ride to work on horses nor do we kick the shit from our boots before we go into the general store. Cattle do not roam the streets, we don't eat BBQ every day. Most of the metroplex that has the name, "Kansas City," is actually on the Missouri side with the sister component in Kansas being much smaller (yet every Hollywood script writer puts the entire city in Kansas because they can't be bothered to look at a fucking map). And contrary to popular belief, the city is not inhabited by Larry the Cable Guy clones driving massive trucks tricked out with coal rollers and lift kits.

And I do not think I have ever owned a pair of cowboy boots.

This friendly rant is brought to you by the letter, "N." N is for Nostalgia.
Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

w from brisbane is gonna tell you...

Posted Tuesday
But, what you do have in Missouri, is the State Animal is the mule.

NBlob ducks in to say...

Posted Tuesday
"passed over North Kansas City and landed in Kansas City North (further north)"

And you lot laugh at Mooloolaba, Woolomoloo and Woy Woy.

Zombie_Balzac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Tuesday
To be fair, we laugh at them too. See "Simon's Grandad" and Woy Woy Downing. "You're from where?"

yankeedog asserts...

Posted Tuesday
Don't listen to Murph. KC is a dusty cattle town where people eat barbecue every day, in front of the saloons with the swinging doors and the guys playing honky-tonk pianos right before the bar-fights start.

Zombie_Balzac mutters...

Posted Tuesday
Careful y-dog! If you go to KC or KC North or North KC or Even Further North KC, Murph might jest call you out. Two men in the dusty main street, facing each other through the honking traffic.

damian asserts...

Posted Tuesday
We have Point Danger, Mount Warning and Mount Mistake in roughly a straight line

NBlob would have you know...

Posted Yesterday
@ Murph, Re: your 1st par. I'd urge you to adjust your judgy pants.

The frequency of back-seat DVD players is testament to the desperation felt by parents of cognitively normal kids.
The parents of Autistic Spectrum kids are driven far beyond the patience of a statue of a deaf saint.
This is complicated further by the strain of caring for kids on the AS puts on any relationship which frequently, usually results in separation. A friend has a son who is at the "Cognitively Normal" end of the spectrum. She reports %90 of the parents in her group are single, %90 of those relationships ended as a direct consequence of the kids' behaviours & needs. Thus one finds oneself as a single parent, caring for a kid that needs 150% of full time equivalent care. I struggled in my 20's, with a spouse to raise a sole child. I cannot imagine how it is to raise a special needs kid, or 2, solo, with other kids, in my 40's.

So consider firstly a life-line of time offered by Siri (or equivalent) then consider that Siri (or equivalent) may actually help the kid engage with meat people through a kind of conversation on training-wheels as described in the piece.

Sounds to me like a Win with Win frosting. Not abandonment.

Murphy has opinions thus...

Posted Yesterday
You got me, man. I am not a parent. I will never be a parent by choice and circumstance.

On the other hand, I do deal with a myriad of special needs individuals ranging from my own brother, patrons at various aquatics facilities, and perhaps most important of all, my students.

I don't throw any of them off onto a piece of technology to avoid dealing with them.

Ever.






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Abigail ducks in to say...

Posted Tuesday

Loved the article! Beautiful story, and as a mother of two Autistic boys I can understand exactly where she is coming from.


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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan has opinions thus...

Posted Tuesday
I also loved this article. Autism is frustrating, mysterious and frightening even for the very best parents. The fact that this child connected with this machine is nothing less than magic.

And Murph, stop lying. When a Kansas Citian isn't eating fried chicken they are wolfing down BBQ. Every fucking time I'm in KC and meet with someone its all "Hey, Paul! How about we get some BBQ?" Every time.

But I understand: it is somewhat delicious.

Murphy mutters...

Posted Yesterday
With non-Kansas Citians we assume that the BBQ is what you want to see. But next time you are here we will take you to Niece's on 63rd Street, voted best place to have breakfast in Missouri, for some Chicken and Waffles.

Personally, I think the Mexican food is pretty good here.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted Yesterday
Forgive me, but I intend on avoiding Missouri Mexican food for the same reasons I avoid Missouri sushi: they got no business being there.

However, I am definitely up for some chicken and waffles.

Murphy mutters...

Posted Yesterday
West side of Kansas City is probably more Mexican than some parts of California. The food is pretty good. You are surely missing out.

Japanese food, if it can be called that, should be avoided.

Chicken and waffles it is next time you are here.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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Surtac mutters...

Posted Tuesday


What Abigail said.

I have two girls on the spectrum and I know exactly what that writer is talking about. Anything, anything, that helps my girls cope with the world is worth it in my opinion.

NBlob swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Yesterday
Are you aware of the T. A. Marshall book "I am Aspien Girl" ?
Opinions?

My Mum is trying to find tactics to improve her relationship with my niece who has (allegedly) a diagnosis of an asperger spectrum condition.
Any resources I can direct her to would be appreciated.


insomniac has opinions thus...

Posted Yesterday
As Asperger's is a form of autism wouldn't you start with autism associations and the like?

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Barnesm reckons...

Posted Tuesday

Thinking about it, how many of us at one time or another when talking with someone get exasperated at them for not understanding, or listening to what we are asking. (or is that just me). These synthetics will never do that.

Classic example when someone says something and we don't hear them clearly we say "I'm sorry speak up, or I didn't catch that" and they reply and once more we don't hear/get it but if ask them to say it again they get annoyed and give up.

These synthetic personalities will never do that, they will be patient, they will never raise their voice, or sound like they are bored or dismiss our random obsessions. How can we not become enamoured of them.

My experience is with the voice directions in the car. Imagine if a passenger was directing you using the street directory and you missed the turn off, or took the wrong street. I know of no one who would state 'Recalculating' in a calm and measured tone and then give you a new route.

insomniac puts forth...

Posted Yesterday
Can't you download car voices that would provide you with an authentic typically human response?

Bunyip puts forth...

Posted Yesterday
Like a Havock voiced GPS?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted Yesterday
I think Garmin allows you to choose Snoop Dog's voice.

insomniac mutters...

Posted Yesterday
I thizzle Snoop Dogg provizzle dizzle to anywhizzle would bizzle a lizzle

Snoop translator

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Barnesm puts forth...

Posted Yesterday

"Like a Havock voiced GPS" that would be responsible for more collisions than driving under the influence of alcohol.

Bunyip ducks in to say...

Posted 24 hours ago
"...responsible for more collisions than driving under the influence of alcohol."

"Working as intended"

Bangar reckons...

Posted 24 hours ago
Hit the horn muppet!
Too slow, pedal to the metal!
Full speed and damn the torpedoes!

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Waking in Sydney

Posted Sunday by John Birmingham

I'm having a brew on the deck of the apartment Jane and I stayed in for the weekend, looking out over the eastern suburbs, across the harbor to the north. It's beautiful of course. It always is here. I can see the Manly ferry cutting its way past on of the uninhabited Islands of the harbor, and the sun turning a train on the bridge into a long silver streak.

If I stay writing this Saturday morning column in the Herald I can see myself coming down regularly to keep on top of things in the city. I'll be one of those commuters they were on about this week. Being here does help. It reminds me of certain truths. For instance the way most people experience Sydney is not as a city, but as the village in which they live. There's a lot of them here.

I took a happy snap yesterday but it doesn't quite capture the magic of the morning light.

40 Responses to ‘Waking in Sydney ’

damian would have you know...

Posted Sunday
Nice photo anyway. The old town certainly has its charms, it's been several years since I've spent any much time there. Must address that one of these days.

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Sudragon puts forth...

Posted Sunday
As a resident, the village concept is a valid one, but that's true of any big city, isn't it?

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Halwes reckons...

Posted Sunday

I was born in the council flats at Chippendale and lived in various parts of Sydney, mainly areas around the harness racing industry, until I was 12 and dad moved everyone to the bush in the early 70's. My great grandfather and grandfather were both SP bookmakers who fronted as barbers in George St and Charing Cross. Both were gentleman rogues, with numerous court appearances between them, and I met some of the great characters of the day in those shops like George Freeman and, at Randwick, Big Bill Waterhouse, Ron Quinton, Tommy Smith and, my hero at the time, Darby McCarthy. I was at Randwick when Darby won the AJC Derby on Divide and Rule and the Epsom Handicap with a great horse called Brokers Tip on the same day in 1969. The grandfathers won and lost some great fortunes between them and I can still do the odds with the best of them. I've lived there since for short periods but always with the view of getting the fuck out of the place as soon as possible. The number of people and the pace of life there is very hard to like especially if you did battle with the roads or public transport in peak hours. There is no doubt that, if you want to make money, Sydney is the place. Unfortunatley it takes all the money you earn just to live there. Apart from rent etc there are so many temptations. There is always a concert, football or something on. There is always a party. There is always something to punt on, legal or illegal. Fast motorcycles are a big weakness of mine and the numerous bike salesmen were always very persuasive as well. The last place I lived was in Newtown and there were three pubs within spitting distance of the house which was heavily fortified to keep the junkies out. If I have to go back for anything I usually just do a hit and run, see the friends, do the business and get out. Until recently when I was there with some foreign relations who were tourists so I thought I should do the right thing and show them around. We went everywhere and had a great time because I'd really forgotten what a great trip it is over to Manly, how the Hawkesbury River shines, what great beaches are there especially Palm Beach where we spent so much time camping as kids, the Capitol theatre with it's non stop shows and the restaurant / bar life. The only downer on that trip was, as I got off a train at Mascot station I was about 5 carriages from where a man had fallen down and was laying still on the ground. Everyone was getting off the train so there would have been 300 people before me that stepped over this bloke and kept on walking. I'd had a big night and was still pretty out of it and I'm praying "please someone stop and help this bloke before I get there. I feel sick" but no one did. I stopped, performed basic checks on him, put him in the coma position and no one helped me except one bloke. He had all his luggage with him and he said" can you watch my bags and I'll go and get help"? Now anyone that knows Sydney knows that they will steal the gold out of your teeth down there but this bloke was trusting me to look after god knows what. So now I'm starting to straighten up a bit. Monitoring the bloke on the grounds vital signs and trying to watch this blokes bags at the same time for what seemed an eternity before he brought the ambos back. Me and the bag man really connected on that day. His name was Ron and I'll never forget him. I'm not sure that I would have done what he did especially with the amount of trust involved and that people constantly tell me that I look like I just got out of Long Bay. Not sure what happened to the bloke on the ground He wasn't dead when I left him so I'll go with that.

NBlob mutters...

Posted Sunday
...,"Which was heavily fortified to keep the junkies out."
Visited a mate of a mate in Paddington a while back. Amazing bamboo'd sanctuary, surrounded by the most intense domestic security I've ever seen. Custom flush set (no-pry) bars, tensioned wire, cameras etc. I commented, @ Zompocalypse, he'd bunker down & let it all wash by. He replied Zed would be far easier to deal with than his current neighbours and showed me his steel front door that bolted horzontally, down & up into a concrete lintel, he said would probably take an rpg. His internal garage door was also damned near mil-spec as baddies have been known to hack garage remote frequencies.

Yeah Sydney rocks.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted Sunday

Everything you described appeals to me.

We live in such different worlds...

Halwes reckons...

Posted Sunday

Get on the roof of that house in Paddo, lift a few tiles and get in through the manhole or just smash a hole in the ceiling. To beat them, you have to understand their desperation. I got talking to an old bloke, of whom I have an enormous amount of respect, called Tom Uren at a Labor function. Tom said that we should legalise heroin, introduce a maintenance program and the problem would be alleviated somewhat. I said " screw that. I don't want to pay for their dope" but Tom was pretty persuasive. I left Sydney and went to live in London where there was no visible heroin problem like their was in Sydney. The answer was that heroin had been decriminalised in the UK at that time and the black market had died in the arse.

NBlob swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Sunday
@Halwes
+1
+1
And there's that thing about people dying due to inconsistent quality gear. I've lost several near & dear to the dark path.

@PNB, His ornate cast iron lace work went into a recycling skip.

damian reckons...

Posted Sunday
The ACT heroin trial got killed by the (new) feds in '96 too. What I learned a few years after the fact was that it started with an internal Lib rumour campaign against Kate Carnell.

Which is just another way of understanding that our tories are fractally fucked up.

NBlob asserts...

Posted Sunday
"fractally fucked up."
So regardless of the scale of investigation they are similarly fucked up.
Reminds me of the joke "What does the B stand for in Benoit B Mandelbrot? Benoit B Mandelbrot."

damian asserts...

Posted Sunday
No, that's just recursion. Fractal is like that, but more so.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted Sunday
l know Sydney the way I know Los Angeles: a city composed of different and very distinct parts joined by often ethereal commonalities. And I must admit, I love the place and think of it often.

Especially since I've learned that one of my high school mates, David Robertson, is conducting the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. If you see him, tell hello for me.

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mrbolano reckons...

Posted Sunday
I like the reference to uninhabited islands. At least we got that right.

But I mainly comment to let you know you’ve got a wickedly dirty sensor on whatever camera you took that photo with. Dust spots like the plague.

I’d avoid trying to take any potential Walkley award winners with that one until you get it cleaned/replaced.

John Birmingham swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Sunday
Ha. Had to shoot through a window

Murphy_of_Missouri would have you know...

Posted Sunday
Sniperlike

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insomniac has opinions thus...

Posted Sunday
I work in Sydney but I choose not live in any of its villages. I agree that they exist, and I think that they both facilitate and hinder assimilation. They are a great starting point for new migrants for settling in purposes, but also can end up being an enclave of sorts. I'm not bovvered but there must be plenty of rednecks who are.

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MickH mutters...

Posted Sunday
It's a great place to visit but I don't know if I want to live there.
My daughter now lives there so I should visit it more often.
Going down there after Christmas. I hope visit some of the museums this time

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Murphy_of_Missouri swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Sunday
I only know Sydney through The Matrix and Mad Max.

Umm, is that a bad thing?

I felt like I knew NYC better even if that stereotype was far different from the pleasant reality I encountered when I visited the place.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

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Bunyip puts forth...

Posted Sunday
Grew up there. Had Brett Whiteley, and Dragon as neighbours. Ended up living in East Sydney and the Cross about the same time as JB was lurking down here.

Left when I was 29. Still visit on occasion because family. One thing that I like is that those villages can morph. East Sydney, Darlo, Surry Hills, heck, even Chatswood.

And the harbour. Used to sail on it as a child, and still love a long ferry journey anywhere, either towards the Heads or up the Parra.

Murph, it apparently smells and feels similar to Atlanta, Georgia.

Murphy reckons...

Posted Yesterday
Georgia? Really?

Wonder what Rhino would say about that?

I spent three months at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Sydney doesn't look anything like it.

Though I will say that everytime I see this blog entry I am reminded of REM's song about New York.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

Bunyip swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted 24 hours ago
Smells and feels, Murph. NOT the way it looks.

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Zombie_Balzac asserts...

Posted Sunday
Still getting to know Melbourne and its villages. Drove to St Kilda, passing a red Lambo, black Maserati and blue Audi virtually in convoy. Young men of unprepossessing mien. Probably just got off shift at KFC.

Tried Sydney a couple of times but didn't like it. A busy and mercenary place, filled with corruption. Unlike the simple honesty of Brisbane.

Halwes reckons...

Posted Sunday

Yeah Brisbane / Queensland is honest allright. Except for the rampant police corruption and little things like the most horrible murders imaginable and the Fitzgerald inquiry and Joh and Russ.

Zombie_Balzac mumbles...

Posted Sunday
Anti-Joh marcher/street protestor here. Old bastard should have died in jail where he belonged. Mind you the five (?) of his ministers who did time should probably have been ten. "Simple honesty" was very tongue in cheek. And it's all come back but this time they're a little more cautious. "Why shouldn't I make seven donations of $9999 under different names using $2 companies? It's legal. And there's no law against sharing a ******** with ******'s in-laws? And yes, my application was granted but that's because it was a good one - prove otherwise!"

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Red mutters...

Posted Sunday
Sydney is great, but some areas are nicer than others. You're right about cities having their own villages, Sudragon.

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Red swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Sunday

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Red has opinions thus...

Posted Sunday
^ Sorry. Hope this posts. Last comment didn't show up. There's a different vibe in each city's villages. Makes city life interesting - a mix of people, urban cultures, cuisines, quirks, influences. I also loved living in the country at times during my turbulent 20s. I moved around a lot back then (ie Sydney, Perth, Melbourne, Wagga Wagga, Newcastle).Sydney's northern and eastern suburbs are lovely. I like Manly, Bondi, and Paddington. I have fond memories of Bondi Junction when visiting my Grandma there during school holidays. A good break from my (then) hometown of Canberra. I also used to live in Chippendale and Newtown, Halwes. I enjoyed its buzz at the time (back in my 20s - ie in the mid 80s), but I wouldn't want to live in inner city Sydney again, or in Sydney at all, even though it's lovely in its own way. Each city is different.

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w from brisbane ducks in to say...

Posted Sunday
Speaking of 'Waking in Sydney'
On this Australian surfing internet forum I visit, there has been an impassioned debate about daylight saving. There has been a lot of good-natured, comic abuse and somewhat faux high feelings.
One of the contributors is Nick Carroll; a fine, professional writer who has mainly earned his trade as a writer about surfing matters. He is a former Australian National board riding champion.

Nick has been occasionally chipping in to the daylight saving debate with a 'who the fuck cares, you tools' type comment.

But he upped the ante with this quite lovely remembrance of waking up, in the 1960's, in Newport on the northern beaches of Sydney.


"OK look fcuk it I'm swinging for the fences.

The summers before daylight savings are deeply entrenched in my childhood memory, indeed they feel like part of my physical nature. I would wake up not long after the light had begun to colour the eastern sky, maybe around 4.30am, and wander the silent house, smelling the cool air, delighting in the human silence and the sense of being alone with the world as it is, not as we would have it be. We lived on a main road, but a main road that had one lane of traffic either way and no gutters, just a dirt verge - at times during a working day, ten minutes would pass without a car. In that silent early summer, you could hear nothing but birds and maybe the sound of the ocean just over the crest of the road above our house. Not that it meant anything to me then. I would tiptoe down the hall to the kitchen and dig out four or five Arnotts Milk Arrowroot biscuits from the biscuit can, and tiptoe back to our bedroom and sit quietly nibbling the biscuits, and listen as the world slowly awoke to the sun.

Those mornings are as indelible a part of my life's accounting as any memory of a wave ridden. They live in a place inhabited by few other things, most of which have to do with my children or with sex or long barrels. Yet they feel to me like a kind of fluke, an unplanned thing, something I stumbled into as a very little boy, my mind still unformed, waiting for something as simple as an early summer morning to imprint itself almost casually into my flesh and still speak to me 50 years later, as I am sure it will on my deathbed. Christ I am so sad about the world, how quickly it will pass, I will die and it will all be gone, for all my cleverness and writerly skills my experience of it will vanish as if it never existed. And what am I or any of us but one among billions, here and gone, and the world goes on, which is the only thing that makes any of it bearable.

So yeah who really gives a fcuk about daylight savings."

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Therbs mumbles...

Posted Monday

I've lived in the burbs and a few "villages" in Sydney. I'm lucky in that I commute via a short bus trip and the Eastern Suburbs rail, I live a few minutes walk from two beaches and no longer need to own a rusting out car.

Rozelle and Balmain were fantastic places to do the felafel thing in the 80's and 90's. Sitting on the back deck of a converted boathouse in Balmain, pulling cones at midnight and observing "cigar" boats running no lights, pulling up to the big mansion on the point near Dawn Fraser pool.

Still, you walk around in various streets and feel the pulse of that neighbourhood whether it be boy racers drowning out lawn mowers; a mix of coffee shops and cute 2nd hand joints or converted warehouses sporting flashy glam and the hangover of spent disco biscuits.

Aside from that there's good pubs. nosh holes and currently a craft beer festival.

insomniac mutters...

Posted Monday
I swam in the Dawn Fraser pool once while I was working in Balmain. I was doing laps and touched something under the water which freaked me out - that and feeling sick as a dog for days afterwards. Parramatta River water doesn't agree with me.

Therbs ducks in to say...

Posted Monday
What you touched was probably jelly fish. We used to call that pool Dawn's Dirty Bottom. It was popular enough though. The water polo guys used to train there, made me think it was ok.

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Rob swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Monday
I went to Sydney as a wee 12 year old on holiday from New Zealand. My Mom wanted to see the Sydney Biennale We visited expat kiwis living in Bondi and stayed in Kirribilli. Went skating with some cool kids around car parks. I had a great time. Such relaxed wonderful friendly people, unlike New Zealand which was uptight and a bit pov. So I always had a romantic view of Sydney, then I moved there in 97 as an adult and stayed in the western suburbs for 9 months until moving to Tasmania for Uni. Too expensive, couldn't get a decent job without a degree, full of nut bars. Trying to take my kids to the park and it's got guys fuking prostitutes at park benches. Decided to get out. But one weird thing struck me about Sydney. The friendliness of the people (even the police were nice). I couldn't stand in a shop queue without striking up a conversation with somebody regardless of their ethnicity or background. I was in a Hobart supermarket a few weeks back and this woman started talking to me about things, I was really taken aback about it. Turns out she was from Sydney and thinking of moving down here. Light bulb moment, aha, we don't talk in queues down here in the apple isle. Because we are basically unfriendly and a bit conceited regardless of what the government propaganda might suggest

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Bondiboy66 ducks in to say...

Posted Monday
I've lived in Sydney's East for virtually all of my life. As a kid near Maroubra Junction, then mainly Bondi from about age 11 onwards. In Sydney the furthest west I have lived as about 100m west of Anzac Pde near Kingsford... I lived up Tamworth/Armidale way for about 2.5 years at one point - and hated it. Some aspects were ok, but it was a bad time of my life, and frankly the country bored the shit out of me.

I know Sydney's shortcomings. Crowds, expense, dickheads...but they are evened out by the beaches, the conviences, the attractions. Even my beloved Scum Valley (what Bondi was called in the 80s) has loads of difficulties, but when you know what they are you deal with them. The weekend just past was a good illustration of why I love the place. Walk to the beach both days, water was clean and the surf up, surf club patrol saturday, kids nippers sunday...saturday night Wifey and I walked down the road to a new Italian restaurant for a rare child-free dinner...so nice!

Therbs is gonna tell you...

Posted Monday
Bronte was pretty damn good as well yesterday morning. New wog nosh in Bondi? Any good?

Bondiboy66 mutters...

Posted Yesterday
Its called Da Orazio, and its in the bottom of the former Hakoa Club in Hall St. I had the Porchetta alla Romana - bloody good. The Focaccia con Porchetta looks bloody good, thats for next visit. Desserts are bloody nice too.

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dweeze has opinions thus...

Posted Monday
Sydney-
A great place to visit
A better place to leave
Won't catch me living there ever again. Or any city for that matter.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted Monday
You feel that way because you've never been to Butte, Montana.

Anthony mutters...

Posted Monday
I'd like to make a Butte crack, but I can't think of one...

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yankeedog ducks in to say...

Posted Tuesday
Off topic, but I need some help from the ladies and gentlemen of the Burger jury.

I just saw the trailer for the game 'Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare', and if anyone can pull it up on YouTube, go to 0:52 in the clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSp8ZqIKEIM

Is it me, or does that guy have the appearance of a certain Australian author? Also has a bit of your Prime Minister, Heyyyyyaaabbbootttt, as well. It's Birmingabbott! Or Abbingham. Something like that...

Therbs mutters...

Posted Tuesday

Hey YD, Abbott is also an author. Had his book launch travel paid for by us and got away with it. Another reason we're hoping Putin ices him with some sort of secret ninja judo death hold at the G20, T20, i20 or whatever 20 it is those guys are soon having in Brisvegas.

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Respond to 'Waking in Sydney '

Just hammered the final nail into the copyedit of Dave II (Resistance)

Posted Thursday into Writing by John Birmingham

Both versions: Aus/UK and US. Below is the Australian cover.

I'll sign off the final proof pages of Dave 1 ('Emergence') on Monday.

And finish the rewrite of the second draft of Dave 3 (Ascendance) mid next week.

Then the Dave Hooper ebooks and a couple of Stalin's Hammer titles which are about three quarters done.

I'm in Sydney tomorrow but I'm with Jane and will have no time for burgering. I hope to be back in the new year to pimp the books, however.

I should sit down and write a proper essay about the advantages and otherwise of writing all the titles in a trilogy together. It's mostly good.

I have a feeling people are going to have an irrational love of this series and these characters. I still found myself laughing out loud as I did the final edits, and I've been through these manuscripts so many times now I can recite them.

76 Responses to ‘Just hammered the final nail into the copyedit of Dave II (Resistance)’

Naut ducks in to say...

Posted Thursday
Looking forward to it.

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Naut would have you know...

Posted Thursday
Looking forward to it.

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Naut is gonna tell you...

Posted Thursday
Clearly I am REALLY looking forward to it.

Barnesm ducks in to say...

Posted Thursday
are you looking forward to these book Naut?

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John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted Thursday
Ha. Had to leave at least a couple

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she_jedi mumbles...

Posted Thursday
I feel an epic *squeeeee* of excitement coming on. Can't wait to get my hands on these.

NBlob mutters...

Posted Friday
I see your *squee* & raise a * hands rubbing*

Bondiboy66 mumbles...

Posted Friday
LIKE

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WarDog mumbles...

Posted Thursday
John, what's the latency between signing off the final proofs and purchasing a copy in store?

John Birmingham ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
I think the Oz edition will sneak into the wild on Dec 23.

Nez puts forth...

Posted Friday
I final present for the wife to grab me just before Christmas. That makes her job easy.

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Red mutters...

Posted Thursday
Impressive covers. Love the way the design follows through from one to the other - ie directional flow. Great design.

What a feat. Three books--a whole series--in what... two years? Amazing. Well done, JB.

JG


John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
I think you're going to love the American covers more, JG

Red asserts...

Posted Saturday
How so? Love these Aussie/UK covers. Look forward to seeing the US covers. Trust I'll be wowed again.
JG

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Dick has opinions thus...

Posted Thursday
Not a good look JB. This announcement of a certain blockbuster trilogy is clearly timed to tear the limelight away from Flanagan after he won the Booker yesterday. Lucky for him he got in ahead with the 'I'm ashamed to be Australian because of Tony Abbott' headline grabber. Otherwise his one piddly book wouldn't have stood a chance, even if it does have lot' of pages too.

John Birmingham puts forth...

Posted Friday
FKN RIGHT

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Zombie_Balzac asserts...

Posted Friday
I had such hopes. But that guy in Tassie who has a copy of Emergence in his filthy selfish paws isn't answering tweets or FB request. I swear he's been nobbled by Ninja bunnies. Or Havock got to him first. All I wanted was to be the first burger to read it, so I could do the GLOATY DANCE (which involves waving my posterior in the direction of NBlob). Oh, and feathers.

NBlob ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
& tar
Please let there be hot tar.

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Murphy_of_Missouri has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
Best covers I've seen in awhile.

These are going to be great.

Respects,
Murph
On the Outer Marches

Barnesm is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
but can you judge a book by them?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted Friday
Sadly, no. I learned this when I was 12 and purchased a used paperback depicting a buxom young lady wearing very little in the clutches of a tentacled bug-eyed monster. Neither appeared in the story, and, due to that particular nascent stage of my existence, I wasn't sure which non appearance disappointed me more.

Barnesm is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday

Odd

when I was that age I recall buying a book with a star field on the cover and a heroically posed female officer armed with a plasma rifle, but inside featured a women, repeatedly described as buxom, who bore no resemblemce to the woman on the cover and spent most of her time being divested of clothing by a tentecled demon from the sea.

Lulu is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
I'm sorry that the cover of my memoirs caused you disappointment, Paul.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan would have you know...

Posted Friday
I got over that disappointment three weeks later when, as I wandered through a used book store in Duluth, Minnesota, I serendipitously discovered a small black and white magazine entitled Naked Girls with Big Bugs (circa 1957) that feathered nude women being menaced by giant insects. At the time, it was all I could have hoped for - and it spurred a life-long interest in amateur entomology.

Barnesm swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Friday
Hasn't SyFy optioned that book for a TV series yet?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Friday
I certainly hope not.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
All good. Can't wait.

Am deeply interested in knowing whether one or two characters survive.

Murphy_of_Missouri is gonna tell you...

Posted Friday
There was a barbecue party at the end of Book Three in Kansas City . . .

Shit. I wasn't supposed to say anything about that, was it?

Anyway, it was pretty tasty. :)


Respects,

Murph

On the Outer Marches

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted Friday
Upon further thought, I'm not sure I want to know.

Murphy swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Friday
Why, yes . . . yes you were invited.

GRIN

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted Friday
Then my ultimate question has been answered, hasn't it?

Therbs reckons...

Posted Friday
All depends. Was it a BBQ run by Orcs? If so then I'd be a tad concerned.

Murphy would have you know...

Posted Friday
Well, Arthur Bryant's sauce was in the scene.

Therbs has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
I've heard of Bryants bbq sauce. I'm not sure whether his so called "meat rub" is what I think it is. I'm kinda hoping so.

Murphy reckons...

Posted Saturday
Mind out of the gutter, sir.

Bunyip asserts...

Posted Saturday
I hasten to point out that even though some people may get an invite to any event, not all manage to *cough* RSVP *cough*. Because, mortality and the fickle fickle nature of authors.

Also... I suppose it's a bit late to state that Therbs is the keeper of my moral compass. As in, I possibly swapped it for a shot of whiskey.

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pitpat puts forth...

Posted Friday
Congratulations, I hope you are amply rewarded with good book sales. Tough gig, thanks for sharing the grind of writing, re-writing, and editing. For me it has certainly let me appreciate the dedication and perservence required.

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Surtac mumbles...

Posted Friday


Having read the taster story 'The Demons of Buttecracke(sp?) County' many months back, I'm very much looking forward to these books. I'll be grabbing the first one as soon as I see it.

One minor concern from my perspective though, John. The first book shares a title with one of my very favourite SF novels from the early 1980s, Emergence by David R. Palmer. I highly recommend it as a cracking post-apocalyptic story.

So if you're going to reuse his title, your book better be at least as good. No pressure now. :)

John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
Ha! Into the blood pots with the calfling Palmer!

Surtac mutters...

Posted Friday

<grin>

I'm sure yours will have more 'splosions.

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Chaz has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
nice covers

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Therbs ducks in to say...

Posted Friday

I bought the AoT trilogy in one go from KMart. Hadn't previously been aware of their existence.

"Is that the Felafel and Leviathan guy?" I asked

"Yes! Yes it is." said the books, adding "Buy us!"

So I did and took them home that happy little book family. I also noticed the CBG web address and started lurking and commmenting on Havsy's FKN CAPS LOCK!!! FKN MUPPET CAPPING!!!!! and laughing along with the CBG ensemble cast.

Looks like I'll be nabbing another trilogy some time in the new year.

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Alan ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
I'm looking forward to the series and very happy that you are writing them all at once. Be interested to see how that goes with sales. Whenever I find a new book I always check to see if the series is still a 'work in progress'. If it is, I wait until the author is done before starting it so I can pretty much read the lot back-to-back.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan ducks in to say...

Posted Friday
I am so with you on this, Alan. When I discovered Balzac's the Human Comedy series I didn't start reading it until I was absolutely sure he was dead.

Zombie_Balzac reckons...

Posted Friday
Ahahahahahaha! Me are back!

Next installment of Human Comedy already at publisher number 2. Publisher number 1 lose interest after I eat his brains.

NBlob has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
I have the same policy with Confucian Analects

Barnesm mumbles...

Posted Friday
"Balzac's the Human Comedy" I am waiting for the movie from AMC. I found book III of the series Human Comedy: Fart Jokes the best of the series.

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MickH has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
So how do these books compare to the other ones you've written JB.
by that I mean in terms of writing, where they easier? harder? more enjoyable?. I won't ask you if its the best stuff you've written because you'd just say yes to that! :)

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yankeedog mumbles...

Posted Friday
Looking forward to having these books in my grubby meathooks!

Also liking the cover art for 'Resistance'. Who did the cover art?

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Wolfcat mutters...

Posted Friday
ohhhh shiny shiny explosion goodness covers... will the books comes with white gloves so I don't get my sweaty mits on the awesome cover art.

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GhostSwirv mumbles...

Posted Friday
Emergence - Resistance - Ascendance ... great titles JB, bout time you cranked out some more splodey goodness - Xmas timing perfecto.

Guess I'll have to rethink my aggressive response mode from ... 'what would Caitlin do?' to 'how would Dave handle this situation?'

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Rob reckons...

Posted Friday
I really hope the whole world doesn't get a nuclear ass kicking again. Because I still find it shocking every time ole JB renders a third of the earth into post-modern radioactive sludge.

NBlob puts forth...

Posted Friday
Rob, one simply escalates to a point where the Higher Aswan is the only option.

Off topic veer.
Most excellent Podcast Dan Carlin commented recently: A nuke ain't That Big of a Deal. Except locally.
We've popped the top off hundreds in the last 60 years. In the air, underground, in space, under water & in beautiful coral atolls. Apart from a light dusting of Strontium 90 The World keeps on kicking on.

(Wiki: 1352 bangs, total yield of 90 Mt. )

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted Saturday
Yeah, but locally it is a very, very, very big deal.

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DarrenBloomfield reckons...

Posted Friday
While I'm in the Bond/Fleming groove. In his 1962 article "how to write a thriller" Fleming said: "there is only one recipe for a bestseller and it is a very simple one. If you look at all the bestsellers you have read you will find they all have one quality: you simply have to turn the page."

You sir, at the risk of gushing, write page turners.

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Sparty has opinions thus...

Posted Friday
Very exciting but geek in me has to ask?
I know its an F18 nearer the POV, but does look like an F14 Tomcat in the distance. Still around in this Universe or I guess it could be Iranian in a superpower anti demon team up!

MickH reckons...

Posted Friday
I think its just the angle Sparty, but it looks more like an F-15 Eagle to me since the rear stabilizes look parallel

yankeedog mutters...

Posted Friday
Mick-the wings aren't quite right for an F-15. That's an F-14, or maybe a VF-1 Valkyrie from the 'Macross' anime universe (may as well get them in on this, too!)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VF-1_Valkyrie

MickH swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Saturday
I can't zoom in close enough to tell

ShaneAlpha swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Saturday
After looking at it, and comparing I'm thinking that the mid distance one is a F-14. The horizontal stabilisers are wrong for a F-18.

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TeamAmerica is gonna tell you...

Posted Saturday
Will the books be offered both in print and as downloads?

John Birmingham swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Sunday
All formats, TA.

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TeamAmerica ducks in to say...

Posted Monday
@JB- I belong to a web site called Ricochet, and another member of that site, with the screen name 'Seawriter,' reviews books for the Daily News of Galveston County, Texas, a paper whose circulation is 29,000. I recently had this exchange with him and I wanted to let you know that if he contacts you, he is a legitimate book reviewer:
Have not reviewed any of his writings. Normally I only review newly-released books (within the last 12 months), whether first release or reprint.

If Birmingham is still around, or his books are being republished, the publisher can send me a copy and I will read it. What I tell publishers and authors is I will read any book sent to me, but will not guarantee I will review it. What I will guarantee is if I review it, it will be a positive review. I try to recommend 50+ books worth reading to my audience.

Do you know author or publisher? If so, get them in contact with me and we can go from there.

——–10/19/2014———
As I recall, I spoke to you a while back about an Aussie sci-fi writer named John Birmingham. He’s written many books, not all sci-fi, but is perhaps best known for his Axis of Time trilogy which begins with ‘Weapons of Choice,’ which I highly recommend. By any chance, have you reviewed any of his writings?


John Birmingham mumbles...

Posted Monday
Thx, TA. I'll have the publishers add himn to the list.

NBlob has opinions thus...

Posted Monday
You'd do we'll to ad a Mr N Blob to that list of early release for review. Very influential reviewer. Short-track to Mann-Booker, Vogel, PM's, Pulitzer, Hugo, Orange & Jerusalem Prizes committees.
You may not have heard of him, he keeps a low profile as um privacy 'n stuff.

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TeamAmerica is gonna tell you...

Posted Monday
Addendum: 'Seawriter's real name is Mark Lardas, and here is one of his reviews: http://ricochet.com/this-weeks-book-review-monster-hunter-nemesis/
(Ricochet has a readership in the hundred's of thousands, so his Ricochet reviews potentially would reach a large audience.)

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TeamAmerica swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted Monday
@Paul_Nicholas_Boylan- "" Mark Lardas" Bummer, dude"
Yeah, like Dick Butkis

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan has opinions thus...

Posted Monday
Another excellent example.

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Zombie_Balzac mumbles...

Posted Tuesday
Dammit! I finally heard from the guy that has a copy. I quote, "nope nope nope nope....ALL MINE". This is disappointing. Can anyone lend me a few Ninjas?

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Chicom Mick is gonna tell you...

Posted Tuesday
Concur with Murphy - great covers. Looking forward to the contents also.

Great stuff JB.

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Guy ducks in to say...

Posted 19 hours ago
Will certainly give this one a try, but personally I'm more excited by the news of new Stalin's Hammer. It's been a while - need my fix.

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S.M. Stirling swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted 7 hours ago
It's excellent stuff, in my opinion. Just sayin'.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted 5 hours ago
Yeah, but what if you're wrong? What happens then??

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Respond to 'Just hammered the final nail into the copyedit of Dave II (Resistance)'