Cheeseburger Gothic

A nine year girl attempts to explain the appeal of Minecraft.

Posted May 7, 2013 into Games by alexmac

A guest post by Alex McClintock.

When Alex fronted me a while back with a mad gleam in his eye for an 8-bit gme called FTL, I was very much WTF. I've never understood the appeal of retro games. Except maybe Defender, and then only in retrospect. I have fond memories of wasting hours in the common room at uni playing that one. Doesn't mean I'd want to repeat the experience. But his enthusiasm for FTL made me wonder if he might be some sort of Minecraft fiend too. No. Sadly, he couldn't explain the appeal of it. But his nine year old sister had a go - JB.

I’m standing in a small town. It’s quiet and the streets are lush with vegetation. The green hills in the distance are dotted with strange rock formations. But what really draws the eye is the enormous, pixelated statue of a 9-year-old girl that rises from a hill behind the village. Perhaps 20 storeys tall, it fills my vision and shadows the town.

I am Marlo. Look upon my works ye Mighty & despair

Of course, neither the town nor the statue is real. At least not physically – my precocious 9-year-old sister Marlo created them using Minecraft, the popular 2011 sandbox game.

Minecraft has a huge number of devotees (more than 10 million people have bought the game), many of whom are a lot older than nine. Because, creative as they are, nine-year-olds don’t have the attention span or the disposition to build USS Enterprises, King’s Landings, scenes from BioShock Infinite or giant, functioning computers.

But despite critical acclaim and legions of fans, Minecraft leaves many people (JB and myself included) scratching their heads. A quick Google reveals thousands of forum posts along the lines of “WTF Minecraft”.

It’s probably something to do with the game being ridiculously open ended. You’re basically dropped in a field with no instructions. If you’re playing survival mode, zombies emerge at night to eat your pixelated brains. You can’t really fight them effectively, so you have to build fortifications. THAT’S IT.

So, in an effort to explain the phenomenon I turned to Marlo, who was pretty chuffed to be interviewed. Unlike adults, her enjoyment of the game can’t be explained by some kind pixel nostalgia. This is a girl who was born 14 years after the first Prince of Persia came out. In other news, I feel old.

I don’t know if Marlo totally explained what’s going on (something to do with creativity, I guess), but she sure was cute.

Why do you like minecraft?

Because you can create lots of things on it and you can make a house under the sea or you can make it on a really big hill. You can do anything you like and that’s kind of why I like it.

What do you usually build?

I like to build, like, really big mansions that are made out of gold and things like that. Or just brick cottages which are fun to make lots of.

What’s with the town with the giant Marlo statue?

It’s from Rio. I was inspired by Rio de Janeiro where they have a giant statue of god.

So you are god in Minecraft?

Yup.

What’s the name of the city?

I haven’t decided. The save game is called Marlo’s model but I think I want to call it something better like Marlo De Janeiro.

Does it bother you that it has bad graphics?

No, because you can change the graphics. You can go into the settings and change it from normal graphics to fancy graphics.

But it’s still very pixelated…

Yeah but I kind of like that because in like, the dirt block, you can see all the little things, the bits of dirt. I like the way it’s basic because you know what everything is rather than having it too complicated.

So how do you play?

There are survival and creative modes. In survival when night comes zombies and creepers who might kill you come. I don’t like that because you have to collect resources. In creative you get to create whatever you like. There’s things that you can have and put them in your house but in survival you have to gather things and do that sort of thing.

I only play on the iPad but I want dad to buy it for the computer. When you have it on the computer it’s a bit different because there’s more resources. You can hatch a zombie out of an egg and stuff like that.

Is there anything you want to add?

Not really except Minecraft is awesome.

50 Responses to ‘A nine year girl attempts to explain the appeal of Minecraft.’

Blarkon puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

Aspergers.

John Birmingham would have you know...

Posted May 7, 2013

What, hundreds of millions of them?

Respond to this thread

Veronica Foale swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted May 7, 2013

My older children adore Minecraft (they're 6 and 4) and convinced my husband and I to join them in their games. For all the rap it gets, killing zombies with swords made of diamond? Totally cool.

alexmac ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

Admittedly I haven't played as much as Marlo and I didn't have a diamond sword, but the zombies always seem to merk me with little trouble. Am I doing something wrong?

YB asserts...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yup. Get armed, get armoured. Weapon ladder - wood to stone to steel to diamond. Zombies: Stay still, swing lots. Skeletons - move and dodge. Creepers: Don't stay still and shoot from afar. Mobility scissors paper rock :)

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Spanner swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted May 7, 2013

Brain hurts trying to understand minecraft. Can't understand. Brain hurts. Minecraft hurts Spanner's brain.

Stupid children insist on using Spanner's gaming rig to play minecraft. This hurt brain more.

YB would have you know...

Posted May 7, 2013

You can build a minecraft rig from the oldest XP box. One of ours is a fifty dollar ex govvy Dell laptop. The server should be decent, the clients can be ancient. It has very very low spec.

Spanner puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

That is my point. Stupid kids should get of my gaming rig and get on my lawn.

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Bunyip has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

All ten million?

Helped a mate set up a LAN server for his son's eleventh birthday on the weekend. His mates came round, played on the multiplayer server, and got up to all sorts of in-game mischeif. Party food was limited to the virtual food availabe in game.

Yes, there are clans of young men with spectrum related disorders within the Minecraft community. However, I know of a pair of young Muslim girls that are friends, one in Australia, and the other now in Ireland, that play together via dedicated multiplayer server. It's more fun that just Skyping...

John Birmingham mutters...

Posted May 7, 2013

Only ten million? Feels like about 800 million to me.

Bunyip puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

50% of the emails and mail to ABC's Good Game Spawn Point is Minecraft related.

alexmac mumbles...

Posted May 7, 2013

I'd have built a giant lobster thermidore if I was one of those kids.

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John Birmingham ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yeah, that covers it.

Bunyip has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

One of the minion's wants a server for multiplayer Minecraft. Might have to start giving him vitamin D shots now...

Brother PorkChop asserts...

Posted May 7, 2013

Classic!! My eldest always starts the Minecraft conversation with "I know you think its pixelated crap but..." They are lining me up for their own server now as well. I just finsihed making them real bows and arrows from PVC pipe!! I want to make the 100lb crossbow not a bloody minecrack server!

John Birmingham mumbles...

Posted May 7, 2013

Kids want their own servers now?

Man, they used to be content with just hanging around on my damn lawn.

Timmo has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yep Barnes that's totally it - especially getting started. It's like "WTF do I do? And how do I do it?"

I love Minecraft, though haven't had time to play it much lately. The appeal for me is just kind of exploring and trying out all the new types of blocks that keep coming with updates.

The difficult choice comes in the balance between whether to just build things that do the job, to build lifelike realistic, beautifully sculpted things like I've seen or to build interesting highly mechanised things. Or to get out and fix up your real house where it actually makes a difference to anyone...

alexmac ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

I think the new blocks/variety of blocks are pretty cool. Marlo's only playing the pocket version on the iPad, which is pretty limited in that sense. Thank god they're not like lots of children's game publishers, who give kids the option to buy heaps of pretty new stuff, for a not so small, real world fee, quietly deducted from dad's credit card.

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Barnesm puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

and if I might suggest the perfect musical accompment when you play Minecraft is Cube Land by Laura Shigihara

click here to hear it

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Ian puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

So the best way I can describe it (and I'm among the hordes who play Minecraft, though not that obsessively) is that its virtual legos. Build what you want, play with what you want.

Lulu mutters...

Posted May 7, 2013

Like Lego? Okay, I'm sold.

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ali puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

We have an 8 and 6yr old, and if I let them have free reign, they would 'join game' and 'craft all day.

They say it's like Lego, but better (zombies and stuff)...

They've built rollercoasters, undersea cities, apartment blocks, and the latest is quizzes. Get the answer correct and you're onto the next question, get it wrong (as I did) and you die...of course.

Hurts my brain. And eyes.

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Rob has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

I had the exact same discussion on email with a friend of mine (who is also a parent) this morning.

I concluded:

'I can’t stand Minecraft. I don’t see the point and it confuses and perplexes me. I suppose there has to be a generation gap happening sometime. Some guys on Battlefield wanted to join my clan ( I have NOFX as my clan tags on my screen name) I said sure you can put NOFX on your screen name buts it not a clan. The conversation then turned to how old I was. It transpired all the NOFX fans playing Battlefield were over 35.

Old people are on the internet killing people but with post-modern panache.'

alexmac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted May 7, 2013

Young people on the internet building stuff with faith in human progress?

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pablo ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

My 6 year old and 9 year old play it, and watch the fan videos on youtube as much as we will let them. I am their miner when they play on survival mode, and I can attest there is nothing much as frightening as the sound of a creeper, spider or zombie when you are digging for diamonds in some mine.

The things they build are of a strange beauty. Typically completely functional and often symetrical designs complete with libararies, bedrooms, hidden rooms, and workshops.

The popularity of the game is an surprise in some ways to the greater gaming industry which has been racheting up the "realism" and "narrative" of the big games, and along comes minecraft which allow for collaborative creativity in a lo-fi world. Virtual lego is a great way to describe it.

The latest fashion this month is games on "survival servers". A few dozen players on a pretty large map that start out like "the hunger games" with nothing, they have to race around looking for chests full of weapons and armour.

That said there is some wierd shit - check out the fan songs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4Q39XfTQRI

Disturbing shit.

John Birmingham puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yeah, I sort of get it, but I still dont get it. Maybe if the graphics were just a little better.

Bunyip has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

You can get high resolution graphics. You just need to muck around a wee bit to install them, but.

alexmac reckons...

Posted May 7, 2013

Maybe there's something about the crappy graphics that lets kids (and others) use their imagination and fill in the blanks? I dunno, I kind of thought that about FTL when I wrote about it.

Bunyip is gonna tell you...

Posted May 7, 2013

Good point. My kids regularly load new graphics packages, which don't improve the quality, merely alter it.

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An Idle Dad mumbles...

Posted May 7, 2013

My daughter and I are recent converts.

I started with survival mode, not knowing how to do anything. After fifteen minutes I was hooked.

I started with the obvious - how deep a mine can you dig? how high a single block tower can you build (remember, you have to build the scaffolding then remove it too!) Building shelters and then eventually you start to realise - you can build anything.

And did I mention dynamite? Minecraft has splosions.

For all the "No attention span" BS people post about kids - focusing on collecting resources to slowly create a golden staircase up the mountain to a viewing platform over the sea is a massive display of imagination, concentraion and planning.

John Birmingham puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

Scaffolding? Oh God, just shoot me now.

alexmac mumbles...

Posted May 7, 2013

If only there were minecraft kiwis to do the scaffolding for you.

YB mutters...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yogbox. Millenaire. You will want them.

pablo has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

To dangerous for the kids, there are sheep there too.

...I'll get my coat

Bunyip mutters...

Posted May 7, 2013

Airships. Just saying...

Barnesm mutters...

Posted May 8, 2013

Oh hell yes airship.

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YB ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

Two summers ago we set up a family minecraft server with a shared world. When the day was too hot for outside activities, we would have lunch and wait for the day to cool off and all get on the server. We designated a central point, and then defined our areas from there, all six of us getting 'sectors' radiating away from the central point.

The nine year old build a medieval style castle. The 15 year old lass went on a crazy exploring bender, eventually settling on a comfortable house built into the side of a flaoting hill, with supplies dug from the 15 year old lad's extensive mines. My partner built and elaborate tree house, and grew trees and then crafter them all in an elegant combination of classic English and High Elven architecture.

I built a replica of the glass pyramid at the louvre for my abode, with the difference being that the ground floor was made of netherrack (essentially always burning lava) and had to be accessed by diving in a nearby lake and then navigating underwater passages.

We had communal farms for grains, mushrooms and animals, and converted a central ocean into a sugarcane/ paper farm of epic proportions. My secondary project was too link all of our houses in a redstone (electrical logic magic) railway line that soared 100 blocks in the air.

What can you do? You can make a shared world and very likely reveal a lot about your psyche. I'm sure there are many pysch papers in here somewhere :)

Do I play it now the kids are not around? No, except when I lost internet entirely, I revisited a few of the worlds and had some added fun improving systems.

If you are the type to need more structure, there are an abundance of mods, several of which give you goals and aims that you can work towards, if the open sandbox is not your thing.

TLDR- digital lego.

Bunyip would have you know...

Posted May 7, 2013

Quoted for truth...

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AB puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

Minecraft equals awesome in our house. We will quite often have seven or eight instances running at once across the ipads, iphones, xbox, PC and Macs. (The PC version is the crappiest btw)

Think of Minecraft as Lego for Millennials but with zombies and creepers and spiders and gold and swords and skeletons and portals and lava and so much more.

Best of all it has taught the kids (ten and eight) about programming. They routinely set up their own servers to create closed networks to play with their friends and they are now experts at installing modifications which involves adjusting java bins and other good techie stuff.

Minecraft also has a whole Lord of the Flies undertone to it when they play together as tribe since there are no real rules and they have to build their own society from scratch. Here's the trick - they do much better when they cooperate.

Finally for those who haven't caught it yet, I recommend a night in front of the Apple TeeV channeling the entire Yodcast Minecraft canon from Youtube. It helps to have a few drinks first.

YB swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted May 7, 2013

Yup. The 9 year old was visibly disapointed when the YoggBox mad the installation of the mods so simple that he didn't have to get under the bonnet. The 15 year old would troubleshoot the internet, the local connection, and the LogMeInHamatchi virtual network. The NEW YODCAST OMG time was the boys sacred uninterruptable time. I'm pretty sure they convinced we adults to play so we would get the jokes they were trying to explain.

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alexmac reckons...

Posted May 7, 2013

I know I mentioned Bioshock up top, but those pics are nothing compared to this vid:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=BY1e-KWmU3o

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Stuart ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

My now 12 year old has gone through his Minecraft obsession. The best thing I can say about Minecraft is that when I was has age (or thereabouts) I used to draw pictures of my ultimate house/lair/secret bunker that would include all sorts of crazy features that only a childs imagination unfetted by the constraints of the real world could dream up. Playing Minecraft gave me the exact same sensation as composing those drawings.

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pablo has opinions thus...

Posted May 7, 2013

Something extra...

For GoT fans, you can play/visit Minecraft in the entire world/city of Kings Landing and beyond in Minecraft

http://www.wired.com/underwire/?p=139778

Alex on the fighting Zombies and others, once you get your leather, iron, gold or diamond armour and a bow and arrow or sword the Zombies aren't much bother and even fun to go hunting them.

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pitpat ducks in to say...

Posted May 7, 2013

Gave a quick talk to my eldest son's class last week about what I do for a living- basically find stuff for someone to dig up in the future- and asked if anyone played Minecraft. Every hand in the class Yr4s and 5s went up. Very applicable for understanding basic earth science principles as well as X,Y,Z axis orientation. All of them mirror the enthusiasm of Marlo, with the love of discovery and creation and absolute control, which is pretty limted and limiting when you are between 6 and say 12.

w from brisbane mutters...

Posted May 7, 2013

Oh,..pit pat. Now I get it.

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w from brisbane reckons...

Posted May 7, 2013

So, it's not really about mining?

alexmac reckons...

Posted May 7, 2013

In survival mode you have to mine stuff to defend yourself from the zombies. Just like being a FIFO worker. I think.

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Max B puts forth...

Posted May 7, 2013

Dear uncle john everyone knows that if u dont have the aether mod legend of notch mod or the hunnger games mod then u are a nooooooooooooooooooob :)

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Wyn Richards ducks in to say...

Posted May 9, 2013

I love Minecraft, whatever that is. But "grownups" (arguably like me) play Second Life. I'd be happy to write about it for the blog. The only things I read about Second Life are disparaging comments from people who have spent 5 mins playing it.

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Guest post, FTL review, Alex McClintock

Posted April 25, 2013 into Games by John Birmingham

Lest I forget, today is my wedding anniversary, so I got better things to be getting on with than hanging around here. Thankfully, the very generous Alex McC has offered up a review of Faster Than Light, which I quite enjoyed. I've never understood the 8bit game thing. I'd be kind of curious for someone like Alex to explain something like Minecraft to someone like me:

So I might have gone down the game hole for a couple of days (and nights). The girlfriend was less than impressed. Especially once she looked at the screen and saw not the magnificent ‘splosions of Call Of Duty: Black Ops II or the cinematic brilliance of Mass Effect 3, but pixels - crude, lumpy, 8-bit motherfuckers.

Unfortunately, some of us gamers are stuck with a shitty internet connection or don’t have the cash to splash on either a ‘roided-up mega rig or a console with which to play today’s bloated 3D cinegames.

Luckily for us, independent developers are stitching together thoughtful, addictive little titles like Subset Games’ Faster Than Light that are playable on yesterday’s technology.

A finalist in 2012’s Independent Games Festival awards – I was introduced to FTL by my supposedly hard studying, med student brother.

It’s all your James T. Kirk/Han Solo/Mal Reynolds fantasies rolled into a cute, ten dollar top-down package.

The first thing you need to know about this indie gem is that you will die. A lot. Your end might come via a solar flare, the rebel fleet or (more likely) giant alien praying mantises. But it will come.

You’re in charge of a rag-tag crew of humans and aliens, fighting your way across the galaxy to warn the Imperial Fleet of the approaching Rebel menace. Along the way you’ll encounter traders, pirates, slavers, slugs and those GODDAMN mantises with teleporters.

All the funding for FTL was crowdsourced (which explains why your crew have names like Mullett and Butters). Despite the difficulties that posed during development, it’s a beautifully balanced game.

Though the game clocks in at fewer than 200mb on disk, there’s a full range of tactics and strategies available to would be spaceship captains.

Does one spend money on weapons or shields? A cloaking device or a drone control system? Upgrading your blast doors might seem like a low priority, but you’ll regret not getting round to it once you’ve been boarded by those FUCKING mantises and you can’t jettison them into the icy vacuum of space.

I played a lot of Space Empires when I was younger (I was a strange kid). Looking back, what I loved about it was that it let me use my imagination .In a weird, nerdy, stuck-inside kind of way, it helped me marvel at the size of the cosmos.

FTL lets you do that – providing you with just enough classic science fiction cues to let you envisage your own galaxy. If you want to be a slave-taking, distress-call-ignoring pirate bastard, you can be.

If you want to stand up for the principles of a just and noble galactic empire, you can do that too. And there’s something oddly rewarding about the messages you get from ships you help: “please accept these small cakes made from a stiff dough as well as some scrap.”

On the other hand, there’s nothing gratifying about spending an hour upgrading your rust bucket only to be killed in the second-to-last solar system by a bunch of slugs. And that happens enough to make you want to throw your laptop at the wall.

Ah well, you can save the galaxy tomorrow evening.

16 Responses to ‘Guest post, FTL review, Alex McClintock’

JBoy puts forth...

Posted April 25, 2013

I love FTL, and have played it for a while now.

What's not mentioned in this review is the music/soundtrack. It's hauntinly beautiful, and really encapsulates the feeling of loneliness you get while hopping from beacon to beacon, simply trying to survive.

The rougelike element is great, the interactions with other species are fantastic.

I'd write more crud, but I'm off to play it.

Also, game reviewer Yahtzee made an awesome poem on FTL the other day:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hi-VNkT57oE

alexmac is gonna tell you...

Posted April 25, 2013
The soundtrack is awesome. I didn't mention it because I was conscious of not waffling for JB. I'll contribute my own FTL haiku:

System to system
pray not to see a mantis
Slugs kill you anyway

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Blarkon swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted April 25, 2013

This game didn't hold my attention long. My feeling is that "Indie Developers" is a bit like veganism. All this jumping up and down about how authentic everything is, but when you play the actual games (or eat the food), they don't live up to the hype. I don't have any philosophical problem with Tofu, but it's not steak.

There's a lot of things on the internet that are overhyped because people approve of them philosophically (in this case "Ra Ra Indie Developers") but when you load them up, don't go much beyond the state of the art gameplay wise in what you would have got out of a game 20 years ago.

Sins of a Solar Empire, Galactic Civilization II, Eclipse, and the X3 series all Sci Fi themed games worth a game player's time. And that's the key. I can afford good games. What I can't afford is the time to play games that are overhyped because "Yay Indie Developers" and underdeliver when it comes to actual gameplay.

(See Torchlight II as another example. People were screaming about how this Indie effort was better than Diablo 3. It wasn't. Apparently "Indie" also means "So authentic that we can't hire a great writer" - which is kinda necessary in a game like Torchlight II)

Bunyip is gonna tell you...

Posted April 25, 2013

There are indi games and there are indi games. Personally, I don't have the dosh to throw around at every AAA game that comes out, and when it does, I am usually underwhelmed by the writing. The graphics can look cool, but throw in some casual sexism and/or racism and I'm not interested.

But... we can see great writing in genre fiction; why can we not see great writing in most video games? Because that takes imagination, not technical skill. I'm waiting for someone to cotton on the fact that not all game players are white teenage hetrosexual males, and in fact they could be a minority of the actual audience.

</rant mode off>

Shifty Tourist mutters...

Posted April 26, 2013

"I don't have any philosophical problem with Tofu, but it's not steak."

Brilliant! I don't know why, it just is.

Otherwise agree with your main point... people hassle the AAA titles, bad writing, overhyped graphics, repetative ideas etc etc.... but when I was younger playing old Ataris, Sega MS, etc all I wanted was to be able to explore entire cities that felt authentic... the idea of Assassins Creed would have blown my mind back in the day, let alone Skyrim.

Thats not to say that some indie games arn't quite brilliant. But often I think there praise is often similar to the "Oh, I don't like [famous band], this unknown band, who only plays small pubs and write atonal catterwailing, are so much better" type snobbery.

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Dino not to be confused with asserts...

Posted April 25, 2013

Happy Anniversary JB(and Missus)

What year?

paper, cotton etc?

I got a leather anniversary next month.

So I figure a Leatherman would be good for her. I looked today FMD I got a copy at whitworths for 10 dollars a few years back. I figure $100 version plus a swiss army knife, little cute feminine ones you can buy now and something romantic like a dustpan or broom.

I know.

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Lucky Pierre asserts...

Posted April 25, 2013

Ce jeu est un beaucoup de plaisir. Le lézard, un homme de compagnie, il privilégie le grand boom boom. Mais pour les paysans nous, une bon vin local dans un vieux verre, il est le meilleur.

Dino not to be confused with would have you know...

Posted April 25, 2013

G Greene?

Lucky Pierre reckons...

Posted April 25, 2013

C'est le prêtre de whisky.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted April 25, 2013

I welcome you to CBG, Alex, but I am tired of your games.

alexmac puts forth...

Posted April 26, 2013

Thanks Paul. I'm a long time lurker, but thought this might be the kind of thing you guys were interested in, featuring space travel, keyboard throwing and low budget 'splosions as it does.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mumbles...

Posted April 26, 2013

If you are a long time lurker, then you know I was taking the piss - and you are quite correct about what we guys are interested in.

alexmac mumbles...

Posted April 26, 2013
Totally, I just responded to say hi. I can play games like the a jealous girlfriend if you want me to, though.

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Barnesm ducks in to say...

Posted April 25, 2013

I saw FTL promoted on Penny Arcades TV's:Extra Credit - games you might not have tried #5 and I was interested http://penny-arcade.com/patv/episode/games-you-might-not-have-tried-5 but I got caught up playing Kerbal Sapce Program - Brilliant fun.

but so many of the games on this one sound really interesting, 'Thomas was alone', Tokyo Jungle and of course FTL.

Also nice planning on your part to make the wedding on ANZAC day so you won’t forget the anniversary. Clever.

alexmac would have you know...

Posted April 26, 2013

You know what's worth a go? Hotline Miami. I downloaded that bad boy last week and it's more addictive than heroin. Very dark, though.

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tqft asserts...

Posted April 26, 2013

I missed this on on the humble bundle it was in

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