Cheeseburger Gothic

Happy Boy Review

Posted March 14 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

"The best vegetarian dish always comes with ground up pork."

10 Responses to ‘Happy Boy Review’

insomniac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted March 14
Isn't that the Asian thing though? Anything but beef can go in a vego dish.

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John Birmingham puts forth...

Posted March 14
Haha. This was supposed to be a placeholder entry, not to be published until I'd done the full review. Still, that one line sums my thoughts exactly.

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jason mumbles...

Posted March 14
Get back to work Birmingham

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Barnesm asserts...

Posted March 14
I believe vegetarians are a dish best served cold

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Dave W swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted March 15
Vegetarian food fets served with a side of incredulity.

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Lulu asserts...

Posted March 15
Sounds like they were eating mapo tofu.

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Bondiboy66 has opinions thus...

Posted March 15
You don't win friends with salad

Sudragon reckons...

Posted March 15
You don't win wars with salad.

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Peter in the bleachers ducks in to say...

Posted March 16
Isn't the answer always bacon?

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stevetheh reckons...

Posted March 16
Had a mate who once served up a dish of Tofu made from the lard bits at the bottom of his BBQ pan (pork roast on spit done the night before).
Was done as a joke for us meat people...problem was it looked damn close to the real thing, guy was a frackin artist with this stuff.
Enter one Vego who was a bit peckish...
Literally before anyone could do/say anything grabbed a slice and gobbed in.
That look of complete and utter horror will stay with me forever.
Thank Glod (TP) the garden was only one doorway away...

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Nespresso, the secret of my deadline success

Posted November 18 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

It's no secret that I've been cranking the words of late. But although I've tweaked a few things in my workflow, I credit this bad boy, the Nespresso Pixie, with keeping me at the keyboard and on my game a little longer each day.

I resisted buying one for a long time. Long enough that Jane eventually rolled her eyes and made the purchase anyway.

I was sceptical. But I have seen the Light.

I recall reading an article in The New Yorker a whole ago about how coffee making was ripe for automation, but having had the experience of campus coffee machines long ago, I didn't believe them. Turns out I should have. There is of course both art and science to brewing a perfect cup, but the art is rare and for most of us it can be replaced by the science. A good barista is a craftsman or woman of great skill, but making coffee is also a process that lends itself to being programmed. A controlled blend of coffee grounds, exposed to water of a specific temparture and pressure for a measured amount of time will deliver that same result every time.

Get those inputs right and your output will be unvaryingly sublime.

That's why a lot of restaurants sneakily, shamefully make your coffee out of sight now. They're using a Nespresso machine.

If you order an after-dinner espresso at roughly a third of the twenty-four hundred Michelin-starred restaurants in the world, you receive a demitasse filled with a thin drink that came out of small, thimble-shaped pod packed with five or six grams of coffee that was pre-ground a month or more prior. You are drinking Nespresso, which has quietly infiltrated restaurants all over the world in the name of convenience and consistency - The New Yorker.

For me, it's meant fewer trips to the local cafe. Much fewer. I still buy coffee while I'm out, but I'm even pickier and more dismissive of shitty brown water than I used to be, especially at $4 a pop. The unit cost of each Nespresso pod is about 70c. Plus I'm not having them with muffins or brownies, so I've cut out hundreds of sugary calories a day. I've lost weight using this thing! About a kilo and a half. (And grabbed an hour of time for myself that I've been using to write more).

The coffee is uniformly good and comes in dozens of different blends, some flavoured with natural oils to create chocolate or caramel aromas. I usually stock up on pods every four or five weeks and there's a lovely air of Jony Ive-style wankery to the set up at the Nesresso shop. In fact, the whole thing reminds me of the vaguely cultish experience of visiting the Apple Store.

So naturally, I approve.

20 Responses to ‘Nespresso, the secret of my deadline success’

sibeen swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 18
Yes. Had one for three years now. The morning visit to the bench has now become ritual.

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Chaz mutters...

Posted November 18
We've had ours for years, of course there was much wailing about costs when I got it!

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Rhino mutters...

Posted November 19
Espresso. Tea. Bourbon. Gin. Heroin. Meth. Whatever it takes to get you to the desk and pumping out words.

damian reckons...

Posted November 20
Auden classified most of those as "modern labor saving technology" for writers, along with benzedrine but minus the meth which hadn't become popular by his time.

Lulu is gonna tell you...

Posted November 21
Didn't benzedrine do pretty much the same thing as meth? I read somewhere about David Selznick making Gone With The Wind on "bennies" - sleeping one day a week or something ridiculous.

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trib ducks in to say...

Posted November 19
Birmo! You're killing me.

Nespresso and its ilk are responsible for an insane amount of additional landfill because their pods aren't biodegradable. The coffee itself, fantastic compost, but it's locked away in aluminium packaging.

Aunty covered this recently on Lateline

Biodegradable pods are starting to emerge, so I encourage you to use those or a pod recycler. Details in aforementioned ABC story - http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-24/former-nespresso-boss-warns-coffee-pods-are-killing-environment/7781810

insomniac puts forth...

Posted November 19
What trib said

NBlob ducks in to say...

Posted November 19
Indeed. If one was to set out to design a Worst choice, one might have lined the pods with foetal white rhino hide. But that'd be about it. I love coffee, I accept schlepping it from the mountains isn't exactly carbon neutral, but the pods are to much for me.

John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted November 20
They've got a recycling program now. The pods get reclaimed for the aluminium and the coffee grounds go to agriculture for mulch.

damian mumbles...

Posted November 20
Well I agree that automation is cool, however we're now into the 6th with our current coffee machine. Came with a free grinder of the sort where the grind goes directly into the espresso basket. Leaving the grind setting where we have kept it for years now, making a ritual of shaking, tapping and then applying a muscle-memory of tamping pressure delivers great results most times. We've so ritualised that we take the whole apparatus with us on holidays (one more milk crate size box in the back of the wagon, with space for some extra bits and pieces between stuff).

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Domestic Daze mumbles...

Posted November 19
I have yet to succumb to the heady delights of such black magic.
Although I get the feeling that it is only a matter of time, but with limited space in my kitchen........I guess I can live without the microwave after all.

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w from brisbane ducks in to say...

Posted November 19
I remember when you told us of your love for your Aeropress coffee plunger. Where did it all go wrong?

John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted November 20
Still love the aeropress, but i'm running a production line now.

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insomniac ducks in to say...

Posted November 20
Isn't there some coffee based suppository you could use so you're not wasting valuable writing time making pod coffee?

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jason asserts...

Posted November 21
I can truly trace back the best moments of my life to coffee (not as sad as it sounds) and I live in the coffee capital of Australia so your words are heretical to me. But I will forgive this obvious character flaw in favour of more flawed characters.

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Surtac mumbles...

Posted November 21
A bunch of us (half a dozen) got together at work a couple years back and bought a De Longhi machine that uses nespresso pods. We buy the pods in bulk (multiple flavours and don't have to pay freight). The response was so good that our original investment was repaid in about six months.

It's still going. We charge $1 per pod (including milk and sugar) and that seems to work for us (iirc our average price per pod is about 87c and we run at least a dozen different flavours/strengths).

Some of us have referred to it as the only successful project our IT group has delivered in the past few years. :)

Unfortunately, I can't get one for home as SWMBO doesn't like the taste of the pods. :(

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pi mumbles...

Posted November 21
What I would do is encourage your young adult offspring into starting their career at nespresso. I suppose they give all of those free pods (hundreds a month) so that their employees become addicted to the coffee, but as a parent of said offspring, the coffee is varied and plentiful.

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Bondiboy66 has opinions thus...

Posted November 21
We have a commercial Nespresso machine at my new workplace (we got moved here a month ago). Makes decent coffee, better than the instant stuff, and cheaper than buying as its free! Problem is, whoever is responsible for ordering the pods is a bit slack, and we run out regularly. I thought I'd just buy my own private stock....but nooooo. The Nespresso shop near home informs me the commercial machine pods (which look sort of like a foil wrapped biscuit) can't be bought in a shop, only ordered from the manufacturer...argh!

So just nick a handful of the pods when they come in and keep them in my desk drawer.

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Dirk swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 30
It seems you can't stay of the Burger for a week, and people are starting to talk jibberish.

I just want to point to this baby, to show you your errant ways:

http://www.koffiediscounter.nl/img/eda1541c-1761-48c6-a075-fba9d456e50a/saeco-moltio-hd8769.jpg?w=&h=&q=80

Dave W asserts...

Posted December 1
Agreed. I think I have the previous model in this range. It is the duck's nuts.

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My secret shame is over

Posted November 26, 2015 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

I can't cook steak. There. I said it. But it's true. Even though I'm a medium rare guy, I always end burning the crap of my choice cuts. I blame the unreasonable demands of the 'well done' brigade to be served up a plate with nary a drop of the red stuff on it.

Really hoping that this Steakmate app I put on my phone today helps. It's from the Meat and Livestock Corporation, so you'd hope they knew what they were doing.

It seems to have a pretty simple interface. You choose your steak, enter some data like thickness and how well done (or not) you want it, and it sets a timer on your phone and/or watch telling you when to turn and when to remove and rest.

You can set multiple timers for people who want their meat done differently. Thomas and I are both medium rare men. The ladies, not so much.

It only does steak for the moment, but presumably it could be further developed to handle lamb, pork and so on.

Now all I need is a new barbecue to test it out on. My old four burner has not weathered the latest of its ten winters all that well.

35 Responses to ‘My secret shame is over’

w from brisbane swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 26, 2015
I'm an old school medium rare man too, but cook for some other family members who insist that their steak have no sign of red (yew!). I sometimes just can't be bothered with the time scheduling challenges. I've decided recently it's a little outmoded to be so very fussy about medium rare. I reckon, a few decades ago, the average steak was so ordinary that medium rare was necessary so it didn't taste like an old shoe. These days, with high tech breeding and feeding, the average steak now tastes fine cooked medium, still moist and tender. The medium rare preference is a lot more merely cosmetic than it used to be. These are my maverick findings.


John Birmingham asserts...

Posted November 26, 2015
Guards! Guards!

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bawpcwpn mumbles...

Posted November 26, 2015
This is why I like my steak just shy of moo-ing. Did download the app once but never got a chance to try it. I like my lamb however medium rare, and wouldn't want to undercook chicken or pork. Perhaps there's a market here? JB's Meat Meter? With added functionality of telling the app how everyone likes their steaks done and it tells you when to turn and remove each. I could almost make a web app easy enough, and potentially an iOS app. Food for thought!

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NBlob mutters...

Posted November 26, 2015
I've mentioned in the past my beefy heritage. This has led me to be a cow meat snob. If it's for casserole, pie or similar I'll get any old slab O' cow. I've even stooped to the duopoly, although usually I buy from a specialist purveyor of flesh. About once a month it's steak night; usually a bullsh!t expensive (~$12 each) porterhouse from a little joint in Maroochydore. Pasture fed, Not grain fed feedlot shite, 2 to 3 years old, nice marbling but not too fat. Inch and a bit thick Seared, turned twice, 6 minutes total at the rare end of medium rare. *drools*

damian puts forth...

Posted November 26, 2015
Hmm. Having just enjoyed a nice rare steak, this works for me. More rare than medium. Grass fed only. Happy cows taste better - we make enough cortisol on our own. Inside should be red, not pink. Doesn't need to be bleeding, just needs to melt on the tongue.
For those who demand "well done", either very cheap cuts or something glammed up from balsa wood and cardboard will suffice.

NBlob mutters...

Posted November 26, 2015
+1 ATM I'm building, so I read that as GlueLam'd up from balsa & cardboard.

damian ducks in to say...

Posted November 26, 2015
I'm remembering staying at the Cri in Rocky on our honeymoon and getting the full breakfast, which included inch and a bit thick steak to order, mushrooms, bacon, eggs, fried tomato, fried potato and baked beans.

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trib swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 26, 2015
While everyone has their own way, I was taught a near-flawless method for steak (and lamb fillet, lamb cutlets, etc.), Here it is, it works for your average scotch fillet or 1" thick meat:
  • pat dry the meat before cooking with paper towel
  • rub meat with a little extra-virgin olive oil, and season with freshly ground black pepper and Maldon sea salt
  • seal the meat 1 minute each side on the hot plate
  • once sealed, transfer to grill over a very hot flame - 1-2 minutes for rare/medium-rare, 4 minutes per side for medium, 6 minutes per side for revolting
For your really gutsy steak - a 2" thick monster or your Cattleman's Cutlet, go 6 minutes on the first side on the grill, then 4-5 minutes on the second side; at least until the juices come through and start pooling on the up-side. For a thinner cut, or a lamb cutlet or similar, take a minute off per side.
Once cooked, rest the meat for 2-3 minutes, slice and serve.

insomniac mumbles...

Posted November 26, 2015
Oh man, the Cattleman's is the best. The ones we get are so big we call them half a cow, and they are so good you can abuse the hell out of it on the BBQ and it still melts in the mouth. Ms insomniac and I share one between us, about 20:80. She get the well done-ish bit at the end and I get the good bit.

trib puts forth...

Posted November 26, 2015
We buy 3 at a time, for me, the Mrs, and the (adult, still at home) child. We take 1/2 each, with fights over the bones. That leaves 3 more halves for the following day at lunch.
Best.

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Barnesm reckons...

Posted November 26, 2015
Always pleased to see people expand their culinary talents but isn't the Breakfast Creek Hotel in the same town as you? Why would you ever need to cook your own steak?
If you want to take you steak cooking to the next level you should try Sous-Vide Steak.

Brother PorkChop mumbles...

Posted December 2, 2015
You know the trick the Brekkie Creek uses? To get the steaks consistent, they seal them and finish in a microwave.

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she_jedi would have you know...

Posted November 26, 2015
I've reached the Denis Leary "bring me the cow, I'll cut off what I want and ride the rest home" stage in my steak appreciation, where I'd rather err on the side of rare (or tartar), than risk having it remotely medium or *shudder* burnt. My family, to my shame, are still stuck on medium for their steaks. So every time I host a BBQ I have to firstly shoo my father away from "helping" and cooking the steak for me (he's good with a pair of tongs, but will overcook my steak), and then I cook everyone else's steak, and just as they're gathering plates, sorting out salads etc, I slap my steak on to cook. This ensures my family get steaks to their (incorrect) liking, and mine remains to my liking.

I've also tried the Heston Blumenthal theory of turning your steak every 30 seconds (check out the episode of How to Cook Like Heston where he covers beef, and then the science (SCIENCE!) behind cooking the perfect steak), and found this works very well too. Because you have to monitor the steak constantly, you get a good feel for when it's cooked through to when it's burnt if you're cooking for philistines.

My brother has tried sou vide steak, and he finishes it off by tossing it on a really hot BBQ for a few seconds each side to give it the BBQ lines and flavour and make it look like a real steak.

coriolisdave mutters...

Posted November 27, 2015
Seconding the Heston method - it's very very effective.
The other highly-recommended technique - which works regardless of your flipping preference - is to grab a meat thermometer and cook the steak until it hits the appropriate temperature for preferred "doneness".
Seems a bit like cheating, to me, but millions swear by it.

GhostSwirv mumbles...

Posted November 27, 2015

Intuitively I have been cooking all of my meat all of my life using the now-called Heston method, enduring the slings and arrows and empty VB cans of family and friends berating me for my high protein rotations and yet strangely I do not have my own sciency cooking show or legion of online fans?

Marinated butterfly lamb is my speciality - and with a new decking, outdoor dining and BBQ area, not to mention the SPA, I cannot wait till Melba's weather settles down into proper outdoor cooking mode.

Nocturnalist puts forth...

Posted November 27, 2015

+++Because you have to monitor the steak constantly, you get a good feel for when it's cooked through to when it's burnt+++

Reminds me of PJ O'Rourke's number-one steak cooking tip, which is that it's vitally important to hover over it constantly, scowling and prodding it with a fork. It does nothing for the steak, but it does stop you from wandering off to watch TV and turning your expensive prime cut into a flight jacket.

Bondiboy66 swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 27, 2015
Yep I too like the Heston method - but when doing it on the stove it splashes oil EVERYWHERE...which is a tad annoying. I need an outdoor bbq.

Penley is gonna tell you...

Posted December 4, 2015
I use Heston method too. Used to use a meat thermometer or cutting into it (!) but now just go by feel - it took ages to get it down but now both boyfriend and I can do it and the learning curve was worth it.

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Murphy_of_Missouri reckons...

Posted November 27, 2015
I tried, many times, to grill our steaks.

Yeah, while my mom likes hers the same way General Grant did the reality is that Cindy prefers hers mooing and I'm somewhere in the grey area.

So I finally turned the steak grilling over to Cindy, who does it perfect, every, single, damned, time.

I'll stick to ribs, brats, and burgers on the grill from this point forward.

insomniac reckons...

Posted November 27, 2015
You may as well cut them off right now. Tsk tsk, letting a woman cook your steak.

Murphy_of_Missouri reckons...

Posted November 27, 2015
Oh, but it is sooooo good.
Almost like sex.

she_jedi mumbles...

Posted November 27, 2015
A friend was hosting a BBQ, and the male partner of one of her guests offered to do the cooking. He couldn't light the BBQ. I was summoned, wandered out, turned three knobs on the BBQ (click, click, click, WOOSH!), and had it going in seconds. And in the age old unwritten rules of BBQ-ing, if you light the fire you get to cook. Poor man hovered beside me for the rest of the cooking process offering his help. I gave him the sausages to cook, since I figured if he couldn't light a simple gas BBQ he had no business anywhere near my steak. He admitted afterward that in the moment I got the BBQ lit he felt thoroughly emasculated. He was British, so he could be excused for not being an expert; I think they get about 1.5 days of outdoor cooking weather a year, so he's had nowhere near the practice a native born Australian has had.

Nocturnalist ducks in to say...

Posted November 27, 2015

+++I'm somewhere in the grey area+++

If your meat has gone grey by the time you cook it I think I may have spotted at least one contributing factor to your stomach problems.

Murphy_of_Missouri would have you know...

Posted November 27, 2015
On a serious note, I can't eat the steak if it is rare, medium rare, or medium. I get sick within minutes.

No, mine has to be clear of the pink.

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Abe Frellman reckons...

Posted November 27, 2015
I would second Trib's contribution to this discussion. As for the steak itself, if I lived in Brisbane, I'd be sourcing my steak from anyone who stocked beef from Nolan's of Gympie. They use the 'tender stretch' method where the carcass is hung by its crutch in the cool room to age it. It takes up more cool room space and so is a bit more expensive, but the finished product means that if you do over cook it, the finished product won't suffer too much in the process.

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Nigelau would have you know...

Posted November 27, 2015
So, how does the phone cope with lying on the BBQ so it knows the temperature of the BBQ?

Quokka asserts...

Posted November 27, 2015
Surely it's the fit-bit.When it can no longer find a pulse, it's done.

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Justin mumbles...

Posted November 27, 2015
I cant believe all this talk of steak and BBQ and none of you have mentioned a webber yet.<div style="transition: all 0.1s ease; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">

Justin ducks in to say...

Posted November 27, 2015
<div style="transition: all 0.1s ease; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">
<div style="transition: all 0.1s ease;">JB, you would be a fool not to upgrade to a webber, it will improve you skills far beyond any app ever will. Any of the webberQ range will suffice, the new ones even have a sear station now to get it all nice a crispy and caramelized on the outside, while staying BLOODYon the inside. <div style="transition: all 0.1s ease;">Practically cooks the steak itself..............all you need to do is stand round drinking beer and 'supervising'....

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DarrenBloomfield asserts...

Posted November 27, 2015
I've used that app, with mixsed results. Doesn't factor in temperature. If you want to improve your steaks (and who doesn't) you can't go past some tips from Heston. The episode of "the search for perfection" where he cooks rib eye is a thing of beauty. It will change your life.
But if you want to cook a steak in less than the 8 weeks that method takes, the big three tips are:
really hot grillturn often (yes really - it's a Heston tip)no substitute for touching the meat - the "thumb test" really is a good guide for how far on a steak is done.
The fun is in the experimenting.
Don't forget when and how to season: Best article ever on the subject - its Scienz!
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/the-food-lab-more-tips-for-perfect-steaks.html

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Therbs mutters...

Posted November 27, 2015
Steak? Its easy to cook. Make sure its seasoned then cook the bit of dead cow until moisture comes out the top. I usually sear and cook one side first for 4 minutes, then the other. Press the underside of a fork onto it after a couple of minutes and if there's juice starting to bleed out the top, its done. 6-7 minutes all up for a regular porterhouse. And then rest it for a few minutes while you grab another beer, get the latest cricket score, feed the dog, kick the cat and tweet a pic of your steak.

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Bangar would have you know...

Posted November 27, 2015
I like my rib eyes, hell who am I kidding I buy steak in bulk and cut it myself, which means a nice thick steak with great sear and char yet still perfectly rare in the centre. Yum. PS dry season sear low heat turn sear low heat

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Spanner puts forth...

Posted November 28, 2015
I like my steak barely frightened.
Take it out of the fridge 30-40 min before cooking so it's not cold in the centre.
1 minute to each side on the plate then 2 minutes each side on the grill or griddle pan.
Cover with foil and rest.
Place steak in mouth hole and wash down with red.

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ShaneAlpha would have you know...

Posted November 28, 2015
The meat makes a lot of difference. A mate of mine, also a good cook, worked for a couple of years for AMH and would buy the *good* export stuff that you never, ever, ever see in Australia. I still, 20 years later, remember the time he cooked beer fed Kobe beef. It was like my mouth had an orgasm.

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Brother PorkChop asserts...

Posted December 2, 2015
A SAFFA mate cooks his delicious meat whole first over flames. Trims and Rubs a whole rib fillet, chars the outside. Slices it into steaks then grills each one to the diners liking. I found it delicious but time consuming when hungry.

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The 4th Whisky Advent Calendar

Posted November 12, 2015 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

I can't believe I missed the first three! Why was I not told? WHY!?!

There are 24 little whisky windows to open, of course, and according to the website "highlights among this year’s 24 drams include a rare 50-year-old Scotch, an award-winning Japanese whisky and the World’s Best Blended Whisky (World Whiskies Awards 2014). Each handmade, wax-sealed dram allows whisky fans to sample a new whisky, tasting everything from single grain whisky to rare Scotch worth up to £350 a bottle..."

20 Responses to ‘The 4th Whisky Advent Calendar’

trib is gonna tell you...

Posted November 12, 2015
How did I not know this existed?

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GhostSwirv would have you know...

Posted November 12, 2015
Anyone think its possible I can buy this Whisky Spectacular for my wife's upcoming birthday and then help her drink it?

John Birmingham is gonna tell you...

Posted November 12, 2015
I honestly see no problems with this plan.

GhostSwirv is gonna tell you...

Posted November 12, 2015
Only for the small fact that my beloved hates whisky - I know, I know, I left it off the dating survey - but wait, hey I have just booked the immediate family into a Gold Class screening of SPECTRE to celebrate her youthfulness, I could present the Whisky gift to her in the after-glow of Bond.

What could go wrong?

she_jedi swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 12, 2015
As a woman I see only flawless planning here. Go forth and implement.

GhostSwirv is gonna tell you...

Posted November 12, 2015

Why are my Admiral Akbar senses suddenly tingling?

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Lulu reckons...

Posted November 12, 2015
Will this be like The Simpsons episode when Homer buys Marge a bowling ball?

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Barnesm would have you know...

Posted November 12, 2015
Its the real meaning of Christmas.

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FormerlyKnownAsSimon swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 12, 2015
okay okay i'll say it and take one for the team to get it out of the way......
"that's the best example of christmas spirit i've seen yet"


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Murphy_of_Missouri puts forth...

Posted November 12, 2015
We were waiting on you to tell us about it.

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Therbs swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 12, 2015
Best. thing. Ever.

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dweeze asserts...

Posted November 12, 2015
Ooooh, that's damn scary. They also have cognac calendars. Good thing I'm po' as right now and will not be indulging. Good thing also that I no live in Canada, Russia, Brazil or Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Pennsylvania or Utah. They get no love...

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pi has opinions thus...

Posted November 12, 2015
Some of my definite faves are in there. Jura Superstition, Monkey Shoulder, and two different Balevenies. Noice.

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Therbs swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 12, 2015

And the bourbon one, and the rare whisky one and ...

mmmm

*drool*

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FormerlyKnownAsSimon asserts...

Posted November 12, 2015
One of my nostalgic ones isn't listed - brand called knockando. Was visiting my sister on the Isle of Mull the year my nephew was born and was sitting in a little pub with her partner's best mate and a bunch of unintelligible fishermen and shouted him a drink. He sheepishly said that bottle at the top (i was on holidays so what the heck). I remember we had a few of them and it tasted fantastic. The bartender was also having a wee dram and nearly destroyed his collection on the wall reaching too high under the influence. Hilarious for us. Him not so - because his wife owned the pub.

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Murphy_of_Missouri has opinions thus...

Posted November 12, 2015
Meh. These bottles? They are too small.

Milosz would not be impressed.

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Darth Greybeard mumbles...

Posted November 15, 2015
This is wonderful. If only i could afford it.

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Bondiboy66 would have you know...

Posted November 16, 2015
This makes the latest Lego Star Wars advent calendar (and a traditional one with chocolates also) pale into insignificance.

Bondiboy66 is gonna tell you...

Posted November 16, 2015
That I just bought for the young bloke....

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I have a new favourite

Posted November 1, 2015 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

I mean it this time. I stumbled across this Teeling Irish Whiskey at a tasting in the bottle shop at Gasworks, with which Mr Monsteryuppy will be all too familiar.

I don't normally get suckered into these things, but I was led astray by my good lady wife who encouraged me to have just a wee dram.

Oh. My. Fucking. God.

This shit is insane. I tried the 20 year old, which is aged in six different types of barrel. It compared very favourably with the 25yo Highland Park I'm currently sipping my way through. Hell, it more than compared. It kicked arse. I bought the eighty dollar bottle, but would have paid more than double for it. Probably shouldn't tell the bottle shop that though.

12 Responses to ‘I have a new favourite’

AuntyLou mumbles...

Posted November 1, 2015
Eight dollars?

John Birmingham is gonna tell you...

Posted November 1, 2015
I mistyped. Now corrected.

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AuntyLou would have you know...

Posted November 1, 2015
Thought that might be the case. Or it was a very small bottle! Really only interested in the true price 'cause the hubby has a birthday coming up. Might have to investigate. Thanks for the edit.

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WotanPaperClips ducks in to say...

Posted November 1, 2015
Should try the Talisker 10yr old or the Laphroaig 10yr old, top notch stuff if you enjoy smoky single malts

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Murphy_of_Missouri puts forth...

Posted November 2, 2015
Seems more like a winter time libation if you ask me.

I wonder if it can be had here Stateside?

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted November 2, 2015
aged in six different types of barrel.

Any idea what these barrels were made of and/or where they came from?

John Birmingham swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted November 2, 2015
Bunch of red wines and ports as best I recall.

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Therbs puts forth...

Posted November 2, 2015

Hmmm. Just ran out of Oban and the Lagavulin is on its last legs. I think I have a new ambition. Here's one description of this tipple (from Dan Murphys):<font face="Times New Roman">
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"To add a unique depth of character and
flavour, Teeling Single Malt consists of aged malt whiskey up to 23 years old
that has been matured in five different wine casks including Sherry, Port,
Madeira, White Burgundy and Cabernet Sauvignon. This combination of cask
maturation techniques has never been done before in Irish whiskey and creates a
truly innovative Irish whiskey bursting with personality. Like all the Teeling
Whiskeys, it's bottled at 46% with no chill filtration, allowing for all the
natural flavours of the Whiskey to be retained."

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Barnesm has opinions thus...

Posted November 2, 2015
Well that's Christmas sorted

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Peter Bradley would have you know...

Posted November 9, 2015
Got a bottle at East End Cellars here in Adelaide on Friday. Yep this stuff is the business, not cheap but lordy lordy does it deliver in spades.

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The Lazy Dog Roll

Posted August 8, 2015 into Food & Drink by John Birmingham

My irregular commute, a morning run across the city just ahead of peak hour, takes me within striking distance of The Brown Dog Cafe in the back streets of the Gabba.

It was a place which intriuged me for a long time. An old, anonymous corner lot, out of the way, and yet the footpath outside always seemed crowded. Eventually I checked it out, as is my want, and discovered one of the local secrets of the southside.

The Lazy Dog Roll.

Like the cafe from which it draws its name, the roll is simple. A white bun, fresh sliced ham, cheese, a fried egg and BBQ – or possibly HP – sauce. If I had to nominate a breakfast to eat every day for the rest of my life, I think this would be it. I never tire of this bloody thing, and find myself thinking about as I'm racing ahead of the peak hour wave to drop Thomas to school.

There are heaps of other breakfast options at the Dog, some of them remarkable value, but I can never get past this roll and a flat white in a large mug. I'd post a picture, but I've never known one to last long enough on the plate to capture an image.

10 Responses to ‘The Lazy Dog Roll’

balri swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted August 8, 2015
Love the Brown Dog. Used to work across the road and go there every day

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Shep reckons...

Posted August 8, 2015
The emergence of the brekky role in Brisbane is truly something to be thankful for.
Mine's from Valentino's Cafe just off Samford Rd in Mitchelton

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ChrisB mumbles...

Posted August 9, 2015
Dang, that could be any corner here in EP/Juarez...Marty Robbins would be right at home...

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Anthony is gonna tell you...

Posted August 9, 2015
Of course down here in civilisation we are spoiled for choices. I think my favourite would be the roti omelette at Tom Phat on Sydney Road Bunswick.
After a night of excess their Goan Scrambled Eggs with a virgin/bloody mary accompaniment is an excellent pick-me-up.
They also do a very good coffee although that should go without saying. I believe there are certain laws about coffee in Brunswick, just as wearing black is generally mandatory, if you don't produce good coffee the caffeine inspectors from our local council (The Peoples Republic of Moreland) pay you a visit and nasty things happen to your family.

Lulu reckons...

Posted August 10, 2015
"nasty things happen to your family"
You're forced to move to a zone 2 suburb.

dweeze reckons...

Posted August 10, 2015
I've been through that nasty - it sucked. I found little to keep me in the cultural wasteland of Zone 2 and got the hell out. Now, it's a 10 minute drive to the nearest decent coffee but at least the views are better. Oh, and no Bruns-a-wick hipsterwanker fashion tragics to spoil said view with their ironic smirkiness.

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Sudragon is gonna tell you...

Posted August 9, 2015
makes you wonder if there's a Darwin eatery doing an early morning Crocodile roll...

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan would have you know...

Posted August 10, 2015
For reasons unknown to me I suspect I was intentionally not told about this place, or what sounds like a specifically Brisbane style brekky.

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Lauren swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted August 10, 2015
Swap the ham for bacon and I'm in love.

Rhino would have you know...

Posted August 12, 2015
Lauren is a GENIUS!

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