Cheeseburger Gothic

Graviton waves

Posted February 12, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

That's what Starfleet calls them, so that's what they are.

Nice story in The New Yorker about how we captured them and made them our slaves*.

Just over a billion years ago, many millions of galaxies from here, a pair of black holes collided. They had been circling each other for aeons, in a sort of mating dance, gathering pace with each orbit, hurtling closer and closer. By the time they were a few hundred miles apart, they were whipping around at nearly the speed of light, releasing great shudders of gravitational energy. Space and time became distorted, like water at a rolling boil. In the fraction of a second that it took for the black holes to finally merge, they radiated a hundred times more energy than all the stars in the universe combined. They formed a new black hole, sixty-two times as heavy as our sun and almost as wide across as the state of Maine. As it smoothed itself out, assuming the shape of a slightly flattened sphere, a few last quivers of energy escaped. Then space and time became silent again.

*OK. We may not have actually enslaved them yet, but that day is coming, you arrogant gravitons.

20 Responses to ‘Graviton waves’

WarDog mutters...

Posted February 12, 2016
This is the greatest piece of news this century and will be until our AI overloads finally announce themselves.

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GhostSwirv ducks in to say...

Posted February 12, 2016
Graviton Waves are the best kinda waves ... reminding me of an awesome galactic curl introducing a mega-Hawaii Five-O.

If this discovery is truly going to herald in a new beginning of space-travel and if Elon Musk can monetise gravitons the same way he's made money from silent wheels we need to decide early on what measurement of speed we are going to use.

The Gravitational Wave-Hunters of Drago, Weiss, Reitze, Kalogera and Effler all could lay claim to having a unit of speed named after them, well maybe not Weiss, but for my money I'd like to hear a future Captain Kirk order a future Lt. Sulu to pour on the glissandos when going to graviton speed.

Does this discovery now mean that Interstellar has to be re-classified from Science Fiction to Science Documentary and could Matthew McConaughey lay claim to calling a unit of gravitons a 'Coop'?

What I truly hope is that the LIGO detector turns its instruments onto the CSIRO to try and find some missing funding to keep our scientists involved in this development from disappearing down an Oz-based Black Hole ... good thing Banannabee is such a fan of space exploration science ... oh no wait, that's only the specious based science of a coal mine?

Barnesm puts forth...

Posted February 13, 2016
Keep your goddman Matthew (Intersettler) McConaughey away from these gravity waves, he'll get feels all over them.

GhostSwirv would have you know...

Posted February 13, 2016
They're powering his Lincoln.

JG swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted February 15, 2016
The exciting discovery of colliding black holes producing sound waves from millions of years ago will totally revolutionise space research. I hope greater investment in Australian science research (including climate change research) eventuates. GhostSwirv, here's a bit about the CSIRO axings in today's Brisbane Times: http://m.brisbanetimes.com.au/technology/sci-tech/csiro-hailed-contribution-to-gravitation-waves-find--for-work-done-by-axed-unit-20160214-gmtmhu.html
Joanna

Barnesm ducks in to say...

Posted February 16, 2016
well no doubt the government thinks the question of gravition waves is 'settled'. probably want them reassigned to some other cutting edge research, like clean coal, or steel smelting.

GhostSwirv swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted February 16, 2016
Thanks JG - after reading the article I have to remind my optimistic self that the reality of current RWNJ (non)-thinking is always worse than we can possibly imagine.

Here's hoping some sacked CSIRO types get together in someone's parent's garage and dreams up a patent for a propulsion system utilising graviton waves, dark matter, dark chocolate and dark energy - and make sure non of the royalties flow back to the current Feds, to fund the copper, (might as well be broad-bean) broadband.

Barnesm has opinions thus...

Posted February 16, 2016
I believe Harry Harrison's titular heroes used a cheese matrix rather than chocolate.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted February 16, 2016
I distantly recall something called a "cheddite projector." Star Smashers of The Galaxy Rangers?

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insomniac would have you know...

Posted February 12, 2016
Still not exciting enough for ms insomniac to care about space. This is what I am up against.

NBlob would have you know...

Posted February 12, 2016
Do ms Insoniac & SWMBO belong to some secret sisterhood of space haters?

insomniac reckons...

Posted February 12, 2016
Perhaps so, but my issues go way beyond space. Science fiction, vampires, zombies, vampire zombies, fun. You name it, she's agin it.

NBlob puts forth...

Posted February 12, 2016
To be fair SWMBO isn't agin everything. She likes ice cream.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted February 13, 2016
I readily admit hating space. It is unnecessarily big.

insomniac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted February 13, 2016
How big or small would space have to be for you to like it?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan has opinions thus...

Posted February 14, 2016
I'm not picky. I just want something more convenient.

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BigWillieStyle ducks in to say...

Posted February 12, 2016
God totally invented those graviton waves.

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Barnesm is gonna tell you...

Posted February 13, 2016
yeah that's just what Big Gravity want you to think. Wake up sheeple.

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Squid asserts...

Posted February 13, 2016
Nice story. I believe black holes have trouble finding anyone to get along with.

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Shifty Tourist is gonna tell you...

Posted February 15, 2016
"Of all the extremely precise gravitational-wave observatories, in all the world, it had to wander into mine"

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Japan's stealth fighter

Posted February 4, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

Two articles over at the Lowy Interpreter, one wondering if the F-35 might not be so bad after all. (Reminds me of the Simpsons joke about Springfield Mall, "Where teeange gangs aren't such a problem any more"):

The assumed rules of air-to-air combat may be shifting from speed to sensor capability and payload. As a report from the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments found last year, 'advances in electronic sensors, communications technology, and guided weapons may have fundamentally transformed the nature of air combat.' Other than its stealth capability, these are attributes where the F-35 boasts significantly advances. It seems the stealth characteristics that were the big selling point of the F-35 may become second tier, and its sensor and communication capabilities could make it the plane for our time.

And a longer piece looking at Japan's ATD-X, currently just a technology demonstrator, but a potentially 'friendly' rival for the F-35 and not so friendly for China's J-20 and J-31.

It is 'a testbed platform for multiple technologies', including next-generation electronically scanned array radar, multi-dimensional thrust vectoring, an indigenous low-bypass turbofan engine and radar-absorbing composite materials. Production of an 'F-3' fighter will not begin until 2027, at the earliest. It is likely that this plane could turn out to be so expensive — a single F-3 could cost US$200 million or more — that Japan may never buy more than a handful.

If successful, the ADT-X/F-3 could shift the centre of gravity in the fighter jet industry from the North Atlantic closer to the Asia-Pacific. If Japan decided to market this fighter to overseas customers — increasingly likely, as Tokyo is quietly watering down its near-total arms export ban — then the F-3 could seriously challenge the West's predominance in this highly lucrative business sector. That, however, depends on the cosmic alignment of a great many technological, economic and political factors, a 'harmonic convergence' that is hardly assured. Japan, despite all its advantages, will continue to struggle in building and maintaining a state-of-the-art aerospace industry.

10 Responses to ‘Japan's stealth fighter’

Aaron asserts...

Posted February 4, 2016
Japan might see arms exports a good shift for it's high end manufacturing industry considering the increased competition in auto industry.???

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Aaron has opinions thus...

Posted February 4, 2016
The fighter would be perfect for ending up in an alternate timeline in japan circa 1942...

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WarDog would have you know...

Posted February 4, 2016

Having had significant industry exposure to this field and the sensor field over the last couple of years I can safely say that the capabilities of REDACTED far exceed the F-35 and it's REDACTED sensor array with range REDACTED, frequency REDACTED and REDACTED spatial resolution provide no hiding spots for either the F-25 or proposed F-3.

But most importantly, REDACTED capabilities REDACTED REDACTED of REDACTED cohorts mean that the REDACTED will provide superior firepower until at least REDACTED.

Nocturnalist has opinions thus...

Posted February 4, 2016
See, it's so stealthy even internet posts about it are partially obscured.

Barnesm ducks in to say...

Posted February 5, 2016
Well played WD.

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Barnesm reckons...

Posted February 5, 2016

and in other stuff happening I see China reached another milestone with the Y-20 heavy transport and Type 901 replenishment aircraft.


As Omar Bradley said "Amateurs talk strategy, professionals talk logistics".

but logistics are so DUUUULLLLLLLLLL.

Murphy_of_Missouri reckons...

Posted February 6, 2016
Decades behind.

Decades.

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Blarkon mumbles...

Posted February 5, 2016
Doesn't transform into a mech. Get your shit together Japan.

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GhostSwirv would have you know...

Posted February 5, 2016

Japan should forget about stealth tech and pore all of its defence budget into developing a Jaeger Program.

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DarrenBloomfield would have you know...

Posted March 3, 2016
I know you share my passionate lust for the SR-71.
https://m.thevintagenews.com/2015/10/12/sr-71-blackbird-pilot-shares-the-most-amazing-story-ever-very-cocky/2/

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Weird iMac

Posted February 1, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

About six months ago my original 27 inch iMac sort of... died. It look liked catastrophic hard drive failure. Of course by then I couldn't even look at the wretched thing because it's ugly non Retina screen offended my very eyes. So it sat on the floor, neglected, until today.

I had an hour spare at lunch so I ran it into the genius bar. I'd already written them a stern note about their responsibilites under Australian consumer law and was expecting they'd simply take it away and swap out the drive.

Instead, the genius hooked it up to a diagnostic rig and set to testing it. I wanted to roll my eyes but waited. They had to do this.

The fucking thing which was completely dead, an ex parrot, when last I checked sprang back into life. I started to grind my teeth but the tech frowned, "That's odd."

And it was. My dead iMac came back to life as a new iMac. "It's like it's just come out of the box," said the genius. And it was. No third party software. No files. No preferences. Nothing. Just a new iMac.

I had to bring it home without a new drive. It now sits back on the floor again.

Watching me. Mocking me.

Scaring me.

21 Responses to ‘Weird iMac’

damian asserts...

Posted February 1, 2016
So when you say "hard drive failure" what you actually mean is "one of your kids formatted the hard drive"?
Just asking. To me, "hard drive failure" isn't something that even slows a computer down (actually makes it faster, because it forces a "format and reinstall"). That applies for Macs even more than anything else.
Viognier in the power supply circuit - now that's a better excuse for issues.

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w from brisbane asserts...

Posted February 1, 2016
Yeah, it's amazing what works if you actually plug it in.

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she_jedi mutters...

Posted February 1, 2016
Well at least it obeyed one rule of physics in this universe - the rule whereby non functioning IT hardware and/or software will immediately function PERFECTLY once in the vicinity of someone even vaguely qualified to diagnose and treat its problems.

As a systems analyst, if I had a dollar for every time someone said to me "I SWEAR TO GOD THAT THING WAS DEADER THAN AN EX PARROT 30 SECONDS AGO!" I'd be able to retire with a gold hovercraft and an army of Channing Tatum clones to wait on me hand and foot.

ShaneAlpha mumbles...

Posted February 2, 2016
I always get a laugh from our clients when I tell them that."You know that they're listening to you, just waiting for you to call the service desk. So that they can then embarrass you."

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NBlob has opinions thus...

Posted February 1, 2016
Curses, I hate it when carefully constructed purchasing validation collapses before one's eyes. It almost as bad as Greybeard, you know, being.

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Blarkon mutters...

Posted February 1, 2016
It stopped working because you needed more Apple equipment. If you had a new MacBook Pro and and iPad Pro, things would work better. Kids would do their homework. Planets would align. Steve would come back.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted February 2, 2016
None of you realize the true importance of this event. The iMac was dead. It has risen. It is a fucking miracle, proof of God, and possibly the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.

Jesus
said he would return (or some guy writing in really awful Greek
hundreds of years after His death claiming to quote Him says He said He
would return) but Christ never said what form He would take.

For
all of you naysayers saying nay to the foregoing bit of irrefutable
faith-based logical reasoning, you need to recognize that Jesus
returning as a computer is not as bad as it might appear. It is a
divine mercy. He could have returned as a woman. But He chose not to
test us so cruelly, which is further proof that God loves us.

And
that means that you, John, are now the instrument of God's will and
must serve the Holy iMac as Aaron served Moses. You will be the Voice -
all that you write using that iMac will be the Word of God.

And that means we, your readers should rejoice. Rejoice! This means John will really and truly complete the Axis of Time story line.

This is further proof that God loves us. Well, proof that He loves Me. The rest of you are on your own.

NBlob reckons...

Posted February 2, 2016
Yea verily, blessed be the stupid mouse

Rhino mumbles...

Posted February 2, 2016
Is this God's way of telling us that Eve is forgiven? You know, the whole apple thing. Kinda ironic.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mumbles...

Posted February 2, 2016
Take it from me, God digs irony. God's brutal fetish for irony explains everything.

NBlob ducks in to say...

Posted February 2, 2016
You know what, that may be the most profound thing I've read in some time.

insomniac asserts...

Posted February 2, 2016
Didn't Jesus 2 get switched off? Was the Second Coming snuffed out just as it began?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted February 3, 2016
Switched off? No. He is but sleeping. And when John has finished with the now divinely inspired and sanctioned AoT, I am hoping (possibly praying, but I may not have time for that today, or tomorrow, you know how it goes) that the Blessed iMac finds its way into the hands of SMS so he will be divinely compelled to pick up the Nantucket series again.

Rejoice!

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted February 3, 2016
You know what, that may be the most profound thing I've read in some time.

You taking the piss, mate?

Even if yes, let's expand on it a moment: the most difficult task associated with faith is the concept that God loves us. All evidence points to a very different conclusion - i.e., that the universe is an infinitely complex diversion with irony being the driving entertaining force.

There is a Yiddish proverb I learned a long time ago: "mensch tracht und gott lacht" (if you want God to laugh, tell him your plans). If God hears prayers, then only an idiot would try to get God's attention through prayer.

Now, if you will excuse me, it is time for me to go and pray for a new car.


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Bangar asserts...

Posted February 2, 2016
Has Aunty Q visited?

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pitpat mumbles...

Posted February 2, 2016
Welcome to the world of Microsoft users. We've been dealing with this sort of BSOD for decades.

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Murphy_of_Missouri would have you know...

Posted February 2, 2016
Strange, this experience is so familiar to me.

Yet for me, it was not computers, it was cars. Notably any car that my father had any connection with. Vehicles would develop problems, act up, have brake failures, stall out, and the like. I'd tell him and naturally the former helicopter mechanic turned forklift mechanic would test the vehicle only to find that nothing at all was wrong.

Until the brakes failed and I t-boned a Lee's Summit maintenance truck. Or the heads popped. Or a gasket blew the heads open. Or . . .

Now, a strange thing happened when he died. Keep in mind, neither my mother nor myself are mechanics to any degree.

This strange thing?

Our vehicles stopped breaking down.

Coincidence? Hard to say.

Your computer? Leave in the corner to collect dust. Give it to someone who you hate with an ever lasting passion. But don't trust it, John.

Not ever.

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Therbs would have you know...

Posted February 2, 2016

A zombie iMac. It's in your house. You know what to do.

Havock - dust off the "Sanitation ZedJB" plans.

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balri reckons...

Posted February 2, 2016
I need an iMac. How much do you want for it?

John Birmingham reckons...

Posted February 2, 2016
Lemme see what they're offering for trade ins.

John Birmingham mumbles...

Posted February 2, 2016
Although, I'd be nervous selling it to someone given my experience with it.

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Planet Nine from Outer Space

Posted January 21, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

It's dark and huge and almost certainly coming for us.

Prepare the planetray defence grid!

From the Herald, and pretty everywhere online today:

Astronomers at the California Institute of Technology have announced they have found new evidence of a giant icy planet lurking in the darkness of our solar system far beyond the orbit of Pluto. They are calling it "Planet Nine."

Their paper, published in the Astronomical Journal, describes the planet as about five to 10 times as massive as the Earth. But the authors, astronomers Michael Brown and Konstantin Batygin, have not observed the planet directly.

Instead, they have inferred its existence from the motion of recently discovered dwarf planets and other small objects in the outer solar system. Those smaller bodies have orbits that appear to be influenced by the gravity of a hidden planet — a "massive perturber." The astronomers suggest it might have been flung into deep space long ago by the gravitational force of Jupiter or Saturn.

An artist's impression of Planet Nine, which could sit at the edge of our solar system. Photo: R. Hurt / California Institute of Technology.

Telescopes on at least two continents are searching for the object, which on average is 20 times farther away than the eighth planet, Neptune. If "Planet Nine" exists, it's big. Its estimated mass would make it about two to four times the diameter of the Earth, distinguishing it as the fifth-largest planet after Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. But at such extreme distances, it would reflect so little sunlight that it could evade even the most powerful telescopes.


21 Responses to ‘Planet Nine from Outer Space’

Murphy_of_Missouri asserts...

Posted January 21, 2016
Stealth Death Star.

I called it.

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ChrisB has opinions thus...

Posted January 21, 2016
...that's no planet...is it too late to say sorry for goofing on Kylo Ren?

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Shifty Tourist asserts...

Posted January 22, 2016
Twenty times father away than Neptune.... that is a long freaking way out. Its not a long way in galactic terms but in "things we count as being in the solar system terms", thats a long way away. Makes a certain Douglas Adams quote about the size of space come to mind.

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Squid reckons...

Posted January 22, 2016
That far out and still affected by the sun's gravity enough that it orbits?

I'm sure there is some tricky maths behind all that but it sounds dubious.

Dave W mutters...

Posted January 22, 2016
Hells yes. The Oort Cloud is out even further and is within the Sun's gravitational field.
Per the above reference from S.T., you might think that it's a long way to the shops, but that's nothing compared to space.
Those nice diagrams of the planets you remember from your high-school science books really should have had a fold out section with 4-5 blank pages to show just how far it is from Neptune to Pluto.

Squid swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 22, 2016
Jeez that is a long way out. The sun should be mighty proud of itself.

Currently re-reading HHGTTG and it's still fantastic.

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NBlob reckons...

Posted January 22, 2016
I can't remember the exact formula, but a big thing exerts a big effect on a big thing divided by distance. So if a dust mote in the Oort Cloud orbits Chad, then a big thing even further out will.

insomniac would have you know...

Posted January 22, 2016
The gravitational force is equal to the gravitational constant x the mass of object 1 x the mass of object 2 divided by the distance between them squared, so essentially the force is reduced by a factor of 4 every time the distance doubles.

F=G.m1.m2/r2

NBlob would have you know...

Posted January 22, 2016
Thankyou sleepy

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FormerlyKnownAsSimon ducks in to say...

Posted January 22, 2016
so they bump Pluto off the list leaving a planet size hole in our hearts and all of a sudden there is a contender? Conspiracy! ;)

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan has opinions thus...

Posted January 22, 2016
Come on, you munters. It's a joke. There isn't any 9th planet.

damian reckons...

Posted January 22, 2016
You canta foola me - there ainta no Sanity Clause.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 23, 2016
Honorable Charles H. Hungadunga
c/o Hungadunga, Hungadunga, Hungadunga, Hungadunga, & McCormack

Gentlemen?

In
re yours of the 5th inst., yours to hand and beg to rep, [brackets],
that we have gone over the ground carefully and we seem to believe, i.e., to wit., e.g., in lieu,
that despite all our precautionary measures which have been
involved, we seem to believe that it is hardly necessary for us to
proceed unless we receive an ipso facto that is not neglible at this moment, "quote, unquote."

Hoping this finds you, I beg to remain as of June 9th.

Cordially yours,

Regards

****

http://www.larecherche.it/public%5Cproposte%5CProposta_
Narrativa%5Cupload_pdf_doc_txt%5Cpaolom68_
20151106195902_Groucho%20e%20Zeppo%20-
%20La%20Lettera%20Agli%20Avvocati%20%28da%20Animal%20Crackers%29.pdf

damian asserts...

Posted January 24, 2016
Dear Mr Hungadunga,
Please explain to your representatives that it is a tidal phenomenon. However we definitely did observe their shoelaces to be tied together like that when they arrived (see attached verified images), and any suggestion otherwise is scurrilous, etc.
YoursEntwhistle and cousins.

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NBlob would have you know...

Posted January 22, 2016
Lord Blarkon?

NBlob is gonna tell you...

Posted January 23, 2016
His continued silence does nothing to dispel the swirling rumours that P9 is a lizard empire craft.
Paging Mr Havoc. Please lock, load & report to your nearest launch facility.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 23, 2016
He isn't being silent: he is pondering.

HAVOCK21 would have you know...

Posted January 25, 2016
OH.....fkn and some! I would suggest!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Pat has opinions thus...

Posted January 25, 2016
Can we call it Yuggoth?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted January 25, 2016
It has already been named Debbie.

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HAVOCK21 mutters...

Posted January 25, 2016
When, just tell me fkn when I say!

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Phil Plait explains why Space X fail was a win

Posted January 19, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

And he is right:

Boosting a satellite into orbit takes a lot of speed. It needs to be moving at about 8 km/sec, or nearly 30,000 kph (18,000 mph) to reach orbit. The first stage booster gets the whole rocket moving as rapidly as possible, then is dropped as dead weight. This lightens the load, so the second stage is pushing much less mass, meaning it can accelerate harder.

That first stage booster has to flip over in space, use the little bit of fuel left over to slow from over 6000 kph, fall back to Earth from over 100 km in altitude, find the floating platform, guide itself there using steerable fins on its sides, deploy the landing legs, then ignite the engine again to slow for the final touchdown.

It’s a freakin’ technological triumph that they can get anywhere near a landing. And as any engineer will tell you, a failure is just a lesson in the steps to getting it right.

Whole thing's at Slate.

12 Responses to ‘Phil Plait explains why Space X fail was a win’

Surtac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 19, 2016

Absolutely.

As I keep saying to anyone who'll listen: rocket science is easy (it's just maths). It's rocket engineering that's the hard part.


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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan would have you know...

Posted January 19, 2016
It is simply incredible. And so much of the future depends on SpaceX figuring it out.

And they are close, but no cigar.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/18/463461790/watch-spacex-rocket-explodes-trying-to-land-on-a-barge

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insomniac mumbles...

Posted January 19, 2016
I contend that Elon Musk is the living embodiment of The Thunderbirds. How many sons (and daughters) does he have?

PNB, I agree that it is incredible to see our science fiction unfolding before us. Maybe it did when I was a kid as well but I was probably too young and stupid to realise. I also find it incredible that my granddaughter will know nothing else but being part of the e-generation.

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Murphy_of_Missouri asserts...

Posted January 19, 2016
If not for a landing leg failure they would have had it. Then again, as Elon Musk said in a tweet, landing on a ship is immeasurable more difficult than landing on terra firma. The rocket suffered the same mishap which has afflicted more than one plane or helicopter landing on ships for more than a hundred years now. A bad tailhook, a blown gear, the arresting cable failed, the deck heaving up and down, all of those are hazards.

Yet they hit center mass, the video shows that clear enough. The rocket might not even have detonated if parts of the landing leg hadn't punched through the side.

Finally, the other rocket, which did successfully land, has had a test firing or two. By all accounts, it could be flown again.

In any case, I'd say they are on a roll. They'll get it next time.

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NBlob asserts...

Posted January 19, 2016
This may contradict my Pinko reputation, but making space a reality will be via FreeMarketeers, not state agencies.

HAVOCK21 asserts...

Posted January 19, 2016
But thats on the back of state sponsored, its fact, that the kind of investment required already put in and really, IMHO still to come cannot be matched by private. They will take hard won gains and knowledge and commercialise it........when it reaches a threshold thats sustainable for that and I think its still a ways off yet

NBlob reckons...

Posted January 19, 2016
Yep, the privateers needed the government foundation funding, but Governments don't have the $ nor the appetite for risk anymore.

HAVOCK21 swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 20, 2016
whilst I agree to a certain extent, I wil say, that gummit acceptance of RISK is very different to ours, in that both how they rank it and the consequences ..by their very very twisted perceptions are vastly different. Its almost a moon mars risk model with acid, PCP and fkn weed rolled into one...oh..and ego too!

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Sudragon asserts...

Posted January 19, 2016
And if you want to play 'SpaceX, The Home Game' and see how much fun rocketry can be, Kerbal Space Program.

https://kerbalspaceprogram.com/en/


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Sparty mumbles...

Posted January 19, 2016
Its all misdirection to hide the secret TR-3B http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/tr-3b/
(Ducks and leaves the room).
(Comes back in again- Hey Muldur believes and that's enough for me!)
It is very cool, and proper 50's sci fi, He has successfully proved the concept, just needs to improve reliability - next Musk will probably make usable jet packs....
I can barely make the worst elliptical orbit in Kerbal Space Program so will not be lending my help...

Sudragon asserts...

Posted January 20, 2016
Mechjeb.

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Shifty Tourist reckons...

Posted January 21, 2016
..... hmmm, fell over after sticking the landing... the Russian judge will mark them down for that. 5.2
Jokes aside, they are getting so close. Its an amazing achievement.
Musk is going a long way to proving himself a visionary (although he needs to be careful.... its a very thin line between millionaire visionary and Bond villain... if any renowned nuclear physicists start going missing, we may need to send someone to have polite chat with him.)

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Mine's bigger than yours

Posted January 14, 2016 into Science and Tech by John Birmingham

Starship size comparisons.

15 Responses to ‘Mine's bigger than yours’

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted January 14, 2016
Man, that was fun.

I never realized how large a White Star is or the Lexx.

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Shifty Tourist asserts...

Posted January 14, 2016
You can't but wonder do some of the bigger ones really need to be as large as they are. I mean, is all the internal space in some of the gigantic ones really that necessary, are they just turning the dial up to 11.
I can see the star destroyers for instance needing the space because they are shipping around entire armies of storm troopers and swarms of very expendable tie fighters, but some of the others... I'm not sure. Are there decks which nobody except the maintenance crew visits. Is all the space just being used for a power source and spare warp cores.

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Squid mumbles...

Posted January 14, 2016
Very cool.

I see someone superimposed the correct measurement on the Borg cube. Would be a little squishy otherwise.

It needs to be at least........3 times bigger!

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MordWa mutters...

Posted January 14, 2016
Keep 'em all. I'll take a TARDIS over all of them - and still have unlimited closet space.

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Blarkon swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 14, 2016
Anyone else excited for Homeworld: Deserts of Kharak's release next week? Looks like Homeworld crossed with Dune - you start off driving a tracked aircraft carrier that's 500+ meters long across a desert planet and go larger from there.

John Birmingham swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 14, 2016
I don't even know what Homeward is, but I am unfeasibly excited by 500m long aircraft carrier/tank hybrid.

Blarkon puts forth...

Posted January 14, 2016
Here's the trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7ior9JoUE0

Blarkon would have you know...

Posted January 14, 2016
Homeworld is based very heavily on the Chris Foss art aesthetic of those late 70's early 80's SF art covers.

John Birmingham reckons...

Posted January 14, 2016
Whoa did someone shoot the aircraft carrier? I loved that aircraft carrier.

Blarkon asserts...

Posted January 14, 2016
Bastards with orbital weapons. They must be stopped.

HAVOCK21 has opinions thus...

Posted January 14, 2016
That rocked..fkn last section.....ZAP....FROM FKN ORBIT!

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 15, 2016
It's the only way to be sure.

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Dave W reckons...

Posted January 14, 2016
Boys are responsible for all these stories, right?

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Nocturnalist mumbles...

Posted January 14, 2016
Good to see the Dictator class cruiser in there. Stalwart of my second line in my Battlefleet Gothic days.

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Sudragon asserts...

Posted January 16, 2016
Someone needs to filk that famous Mental as Anything song for Eve Online...yes indeed

The Ships are getting Bigger.

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Respond to 'Mine's bigger than yours'