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From the archives: Cell

Posted June 12, 2013 into Books by John Birmingham

Got a mess of my own making to clean up today, so I thought I'd reach back into the archive for this one, a review of Cell by da King. It got a relevence refresh with news that a movie adaptation is back on track and scheduled to begin shooting later this year. John Cusack is set to star. Given the success of The Walking Dead and the anticipation surrounding Under the Dome, it's almost a lay down certainty to reach the multiplexes sometime next year. I remember this as being one the creepiest King books ever, and viscerally horrifying with it.

The supermarkets and mega stores like Borders will probably discount Stephen King's latest novel, Cell, using it as a loss leader to drag punters into the shop. You might even get it for less than twenty bucks, but don't imagine for a second that's all you're going to pay. There'll be a heavy toll levied on anyone who reads this thing from cover to cover; vivid nightmares that wreck your sleep for however long it takes you finish and get the creepy thing out of your system

As with the best of King's work, Cell comes with a simple premise. At 3.03pm, US Eastern Standard Time, some sort of Pulse runs through every mobile phone in the world. Anyone using their natty little Erricson at that time goes violently insane. And as the author points out, who doesn't own a mobile nowadays? As millions of zombie's possessed by their batphones suddenly turn on the rest of the population, those not affected at first begin to ring friends and
family to warn them or to find out what's happening, and they too get zapped by Satan's Own telco. Only a small percentage of people remain unaffected, either because they don't have mobiles, or they stay off them long to realise that they are the source of the problems.

Keeping such a global disaster personalised is the role of Clay Riddell, 'a young man of no particular importance to history', a graphic artist caught in Boston during the Pulse. The book follows his attempts to make it home, a hundred miles away, to his twelve year old son, for whom he had only just purchased a mobile phone. Clay throws in his lot with an ensemble cast of suppporting survivors; notably Alice, a traumatised teenager and Tom, a confirmed bachelor of much less than heroic stature, who turns out to be one of the most sympathetically drawn gay men you'll ever find in pulp fiction.

Possibly the goriest of Stephen King's books so far, it won't be for everybody. Never one to resile from painting humanity in the worst light, recent events seem to have darkened his view of us even further. The book is current enough to include references to Hurricane Katrina, and the aftermath of that disaster informs the shocking and occasionally sickening portrait of a world in collapse which takes up the first part of the narrative.

With it's legions of blank-eyed, shuffling undead unpeople, Cell quickly reveals itself as a zombie horror story, in the style of George Romero, one of King's favorite auteurs. And like Romero, King uses the iconic figure of the zombie for satircal as well as scarifying purposes. When the phone crazies, as they are quickly dubbed, begin to exhibit flocking behaviour, and march in jerky lockstep to nearest mega mall to strip it clean of rapidly decaying foodstuffs, they recall scenes from Romero's Dawn of Dead, which was as much a commentary on American materialism as it was a low budget splatterfest.

As usual, King's story is loaded with references to the world of real things – a phrase of which he is very fond – and while some of these merely provide verisimilutde, others point to a deeper intent on the writer's part. The opening scenes are purposely drawn in the shadow of 9/11, and Al Qaeda's mass casualty attack haunts both the action and the thoughts of the main characters throughout. King is also The King however, and a world full of flesh eating zombies isn't nearly
interesting enough to keep him at the keyboard. He amps up the story wattage with a developing subplot about the victims of the Pulse beginning to act as a single organism with weirdly otherworldly Stephen Kingly-type super powers.

It might all sound like a load of old cods, but all of his books would, when viewed in blurb form. King pulls them off because he has that rare facility of making you believe it could happen. I challenge anyone to read this book and feel comfortable making a phone call right afterwards. Indeed, like all true art, the Cell lingers in your mind, having its greatest effect when the immediate experience of the work is over. It's like a depth charge, sinking deeper and deeper into your subconcious and detonating days afterwards in the form of some
very unpleasant dreams.

It can and will be read on different levels. As simple freak show carnography. As a satire on commercial culture. A homage to Romero. Even as a reflection on the war in Iraq. (One character makes this link explicit). For me though, it marks a stunning return to form of the heaviest hitter in the world of the airport novel. If you don't mind being pursued through your dreams by a ravening host of zombies, this one is for you.

13 Responses to ‘From the archives: Cell’

Barnesm mutters...

Posted June 12, 2013

Thank Darwin, I thought this was that awful serial killer movie starring Ms Lopez as child psychiatrist Catherine Deane who can enter the dreams of her patients.

Will check it out, $13.76 for the kindle. Personally I think I should only pay $9.99 that means I can steal it doesn't it?

This Stephen King fella is he any good?

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Barnesm swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted June 12, 2013

"At 3.03pm, US Eastern Standard Time, some sort of Pulse runs through every mobile phone in the world. Anyone using their natty little Erricson at that time goes violently insane" I wonder if this was sparked by the series one finale of Dollhouse which mentioned similar idea, and why they wanted to head to the bunker.

You had me 'zombie horror story'.

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Barnesm would have you know...

Posted June 12, 2013

so July Cheesebuger bookclub chosen I take it?

John Birmingham mumbles...

Posted June 12, 2013

You'd have to lobby hard.

Jackie mutters...

Posted June 12, 2013

Got my vote and I just purchased it the other day to read so I'm good to go :) #julybookclub :)

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Rob is gonna tell you...

Posted June 12, 2013

Hopefully it will be faithfull to tthe book. I read a review of world war z and I'm already disapointed. So I will wait for that to be released on DVD to watch that particular puppy. The book has a really a really good well plotted story that goes from point a to point b, with dollops of Stephen King meloncoly thrown in. The creepy moments of the hives of zombies all listening to the same tune in the car parks as the characters sneak past was amazingly inventive. Stephen King has always had his eye on movies and their push through make sense logic. I even enjoyed Maximum Overdrive which King didn't like, but as a trashy B film it was brilliant.

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John Birmingham swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted June 12, 2013
Dollops of melancholy you say? I'd have thought oceans of it.
I wonder if they'll change the ending?

Rob mumbles...

Posted June 12, 2013

ending?....Must read it again....get me to my bookshelves pronto.

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Analog Penetration has opinions thus...

Posted June 12, 2013

It is a great read. I liked his reference to "robo-80's radio stations" that are all called some guy's name like Mike or Bob. We don't have that here in Oz, but I was working in radio in Canada when I read this, and that is part of the landscape there (my town had a Jack FM).

And Moby was hurt/flattered by being bagged in one scene too.

Hope the movie lives up to the book. Although they seldom do, especially with King.

John Birmingham asserts...

Posted June 12, 2013

Oh, man, I vaguely recall that Moby thing, but can't quite bring into sharp focus. I might have to revisit the book after all.

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Microbe74 mutters...

Posted June 12, 2013

I remember being un-nerved by the premise of this book, uncomfortable with my phone while in the process of reading it but as with much of King's work, absolutely transfixed by it.

John Birmingham would have you know...

Posted June 12, 2013

I was mostly unnnerved by the gore and violence.

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