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A Statement from Australians for a Muntstitutional Conarchy

Posted January 28, 2014 into Blunty by John Birmingham

"It is with wuthering horror that we note the proposal of Her Majesty’s Prime Minister to interfere with Her Majesty’s antipodean Muntstitution such as to effect a recognition of the savages that lately infested this place as if they owned it or something.

At ye olde Instrument.

62 Responses to ‘A Statement from Australians for a Muntstitutional Conarchy’

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted January 28, 2014

You people don't know how lucky you have it. You only have one group of people you have brutalized to the point of disbelief.

insomniac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 28, 2014

come back after three years of tony in charge ... you'll have to rephrase your second sentence in the negative.

NBlob puts forth...

Posted January 28, 2014

Test

NBlob has opinions thus...

Posted January 28, 2014

Extraordinary PNB. I had never considered that. As a nation you've Fkd over an interesting variety of 1st Nations Folks, African Americans suffered the rough end of the slavery pineapple, the Chinese labour who built the railways didn't exactly get YMCA benefits. Hispanic Americans now get it in the neck on regular basis. That'd be almost like a full set.

i read once that the history of American war back to Cuba can be mapped in suburbia, with identifiable communities from each engagement. Same story, I think a NatGeo, said the were more people who identified as Mon in Minnesota than in nth Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam & Laos.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan is gonna tell you...

Posted January 29, 2014

Immigration does not vitiate ("vitiate" is my new Big Word of the week). The magic of the American Melting Pot is that the children of immigrants assimilate so well they, in turn, give it in the neck to others. Ruthless oppression fuled by hate is an amazing thing.

w from brisbane reckons...

Posted January 29, 2014

It does sometime seem a tad unfair that, the more multicultural the country, the more harshly they seem to be assessed on their multicultural record.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted January 29, 2014

I can't agree, W. Oz is a more multi-cultural nation than the US. I know this because I've been to both. Granted, your multicultural record is not the best, but it is nowhere as dark as that of the US. Yes, you had a policy that essentially sanctioned the kidnapping of light skinned native children for adoption in white homes, but that evil is trivial compared to the Tuskegee syphilis experiment - a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the U.S. Public Health Service to study the natural progression of untreated syphilis in rural African American men who thought they were receiving free health care from the U.S. government. Yes, you had racist policies that discriminated against non whites. But we habitually and regularly lynched non whites, and even made the events into picnics for the whole family to enjoy.

You are more multicultural than us but are not as harshly assessed. Nor should you be. You have less to be ashamed of, less to atone for, and less work remaining to be done.

S.M. Stirling would have you know...

Posted January 30, 2014

Nblob: "Hispanic Americans now get it in the neck on regular basis. That'd be almost like a full set."

-- that reads rather oddly here in New Mexico, home to Governor -- Republican -- Susana Martinez (previous governor Bill Richardson, mother born in Mexico City) Lieutenant Governor John Sanchez, and Congresscritters Ben R. Lujan and Michelle Lujan Grisham.

I might add that there are two state Governors of South Asian descent; in Louisiana and South Carolina. (Both Republicans, of course.)

At one point in Iraq, the theatre commander was of Lebanese descent, and the ground forces general was the illegitimate son of a Mexican immigrant in Brownsville, Texas, who was a cleaning lady.

I'd like to see a Brit expeditionary force commanded by someone whose parents came from Pakistan, with his second-in-command the bastard son of a Jamaican char.

Enough with the multi-culti-horseshit.

S.M. Stirling reckons...

Posted January 30, 2014

In other words, it's totally futile to play holier-than-thou. Because nobody is significantly holier than anyone else. Human beings screw each other over whenever they can; they always have, and they always will.

Those who get screwed over are not morally superior; they're just slow, stupid, weak or unlucky, or some combination thereof.

Ask a Tibetan about it, or an Uyghur.

The Aboriginies, like the Amerindians, were going to get it in the neck as soon as people from the Old World discovered a way to sail easily to the continent where they'd gotten themselves isolated. Breast-beating and hypocritical black-armbadism are bullshit. It's not even really about them; it's a rhetorical club one group of white people use against another.

Lulu has opinions thus...

Posted January 30, 2014

"Those who get screwed over are not morally superior; "

But those who do the screwing are very likely to be morally inferior. Whether or not they're morally inferior to the screwees is not relevant: it's the question of inferiority relative to what is reasonable / 'good' behaviour.

damian has opinions thus...

Posted January 30, 2014

Victims are always morally superior to perpetrators, it is just that the perpetrators might also be victims and vice versa. At a low enough level, the continuation of a long-running war through inconclusive skirmishes closely resembles the continuation of a cycle of abuse. Even states are capable of behaving as Montagues and Capulets, and every guerilla resistance movement is a potential abuser, like a raped child.

I think characterising the genuine historical enquiry undertaken to understand the objective truths behind our national myths as "black armbanding" is bullshit. Especially when it is done as a direct counter to progressive moves to stop the abuse, much less than even starting to wind back the past wrongs. It presupposes that it is all over, that the victims should "get the fuck over it" and if you've ended up marginalised and brutalised, that's your own fault. Oh and if you have the theoretical choice to assimilate then you can't possibly be oppressed.

Fuck that for a game of soldiers.

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Quokka reckons...

Posted January 28, 2014

Insomniac wins the internet and I vote that his/her comment be stockpiled for best satyrical communt of the year.

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JBtoo mumbles...

Posted January 28, 2014

You're in top form old bean

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Spanner has opinions thus...

Posted January 28, 2014

I predicted derp and the internets did not disamapoint.

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S.M. Stirling would have you know...

Posted January 30, 2014

Pet Hate: people who say "multicultural" when what they mean is "multiracial".

Race, to the extent that it exists at all, is genetic and you're stuck with it.

Culture is not like your skin color. It's like your clothes. A baby is born naked, and has no culture, no language, no religion, no nationality and no heritage. All that is 'acquired characteristics'.

And you can change 'em, just like your clothes.

Eg., 60% of Americans of Hispanic origin speak English as their primary home language; in other words, they're just another wave of immigrants, blending into the great beige mass.

damian would have you know...

Posted January 30, 2014

If you're talking about PNB or NBlob, I'm pretty sure that both meant "multi-cultural". But I don't presume to read their minds.

Basically I think you are saying "God gave us free will" and the conclusion you draw is that identity politics is always bogus. This is a relatively popular view, though not many put it as well as you.

The thing that got Andrew Bolt into trouble with Australia's Racial Discrimination Act (RDA) was a rather less capable expression of the same or a similar idea. He said that because light-skinned Aboriginal people could pass as whites, they should, and were not entitled to identify themselves as Aboriginal; this is his business because the only reason you might want to do that is to claim benefits.

Many here argue that the complainants should have addressed the matter through the law of defamation and that the separate legal sanctions through the RDA is unnecessary. Had they done so, they'd have profited and Bolt's employer would have suffered more, since the court would almost certainly have awarded considerable damages. As it happens the penalty for the beach of the RDA was pretty weak -- not much more than a grudging, coerced apology.

I think "nature" versus "nurture" is a bit bogus and isn't a distinction that is sensible to make. Most of the qualities we use to identify ourselves, most of the qualities we exhibit have substantial genetic and environmental components and some traits or abilities are only expressed when given specific developmental circumstances. Language is a big one: if you don't have language by the time you're 10, you'll never have it. There's no particular reason to believe that permanence is other than physical, too. Many traits do have a strong genetic component and will only appear through the influence of ones genetic inheritance - anecdotally some of these are surprisingly "cultural". But even skin colour or sickle-cell anemia have an environmental context. It it more sensible to talk about "inheritance" more generally. It's not reasonable to sort traits into categories that may be changeable at a whim. So no, culture is not like shoes.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan puts forth...

Posted January 31, 2014

I do mean multicultural, not multiracial. I think I know the difference. My son is biracial. I am Caucasian; my son's mother descends from slaves who originated in Africa. My son is also multicultural - at least I tried to make him that way. I am racially Caucasian, but I identify with two very different Caucasian cultures - Greek and Irish. I tried my best to pass my multicultural identification on to my son. He speaks a little Greek; we've spent time together in Ireland. My wife and I have also encouraged our son to embrace his mother's cultural heritage – which is something independent of race.

Add to this my son’s American cultural identification (aka “the Melting Pot”) – all of which creates some internal conflict. But so what? That’s life in America. When I’m in church I am Greek, surrounded by Greeks and ensconced in a culture that has flourished quietly for 2,000 years. But when I am watching the Super Bowl on my big-ass flat screen television, nibbling on Buffalo wings and drinking Sierra Nevada Torpedo Pale Ale, I am a fucking red blooded American (I have money on the Sea Hawks).

Parts of the US are “multicultural” and some are not. The great cities of the US West Coast are absolutely, unequivocally multicultural. Go to “Korea Town” in Los Angeles and you will see what I mean. San Diego is influenced heavily by a distinct Mexican culture. Not just first generation immigrants, but second and third generation, fully assimilated people who move easily within the American cultural matrix, but nevertheless maintain their cultural identification and attendant habits, customs and world views.

You won’t find the same thing in Idaho Falls (believe me, I know. I've been there. But so what? That’s America.

insomniac puts forth...

Posted January 31, 2014

i don't think multiracial is a term used much in Australia. Multicultural covers both aspects that you have outlined above, or else we tend to ignore the race side of things, at least until that group have, or are perceived to have, done wrong.

w from brisbane asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

I'm really looking forward to the game. I'm attending one of the many American beer and food themed Super Bowl parties that happen in people's houses around Australia on Super Bowl Monday (time zone - the game is always on Monday for us)

On paper, it is a classic, fascinating, great defensive team vs great offensive team match-up. I'm on the Broncos, but lately the talk seems to be all about the Sea Hawks. Now you to with the Sea Hawks, PNB. I'm losing confidence.

w from brisbane puts forth...

Posted January 31, 2014

PNB, I discover Sierra Nevada Torpedo Pale Ale is available from my local mega beer barn. Bewdy!! I'd never heard of it. Great name.

I was wondering what to get for the Super Bowl party. In the old days, about the best you could do here was Budweiser. I love multiculturalism!

insomniac asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

actually, I bought some Sierra Nevada Torpedo Pale Ale the other day, and now i wish i hadn't. i much prefer the Sheepshaggers Gold or Fursty Ferret i bought earlier

Surtac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 31, 2014

Interesting. I've seen all three of those but haven't tried them yet. I do like the Hook Norton labels though - Old Hooky, Haymaker and the Twelve Days.

In fact, Old Hooky is not a million miles away from JB's Old Persuader in style - it's the first beer i thought of when I first tasted the Persuader..

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

Torpedo is a relatively inexpensive intense pale ale. Very hoppy (think Fat Yak) which, for some reason, we here in the Pacific North West adore.

W - Super Bowl parties are a junky, fatty, salty things of beauty. My favorite traditional victuals are spicy Buffalo style chicken wings and jalapeno poppers. I didn’t see jalapenos when I was in Oz, but you have everything else, so I don’t see why you can’t get these or something comparable. They are easy to make. Slit the pepper, remove the seeds, stuff with cheese (Monterey Jack preferred), dip in batter and deep fry until brown. Good eating.

Go here for more: http://www.foodnetwork.com/big-game/big-game-appetizers/super-bowl-snacks.html

Surtac reckons...

Posted January 31, 2014

PNB, here in darkest Canberra we can get them from Costco. SWMBO and I liked them, but they were a bit too spicy for the kidlings.

ewbewdi asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

You can get jalepeno poppers at Harts Pub in Sydney. I've seen them wrapped in bacon and bbq'd lately too. Anyone here like bacon?

w from brisbane ducks in to say...

Posted January 31, 2014

Jalapeno poppers! They sound festively piquant.
I don't think I would cook them myself. I am scared of deep frying. But I see 'Dos Amigos' at Taringa has them. Takeaways welcome!

'Dos Amigos', I remember JB mentioning something about this well known local nosh house. Let me get the quote.
"Another venue where I can no longer tread. This time due to dope fueled hilarity"
Oh dear!

ewbewdi asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

Thought not PNB. No one on the internet likes bacon anymore.

Harts was also on the list of stockists for The Old Persuader. Imagine my chagrin when I made the 4 minute (!) walk up the hill from my office only to find that they'd never heard of it! I was confused at first and then silently outraged and immediately had to console myself with a pint or 7 of their, what I can only assume from the reviews,hopelessly inferior Boxer Red Ale and 3 servings of jalepeno poppers. It was a sad day. I'm yet to find The Old Persuader but my search* continues.

*I check the taps of the pubs I go to now and then if I remember

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted January 31, 2014

The Old Persuader is an internet hoax. Like the Tooth Fairy and the Queen of England, it doesn't exist.

ewbewdi ducks in to say...

Posted January 31, 2014

say it aint so...

Surtac swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 31, 2014

It ain't so. I still have 3 bottles sitting in my cellar - do you need photographic evidence? If so it'll have to wait until after I get home this arvo.

w from brisbane has opinions thus...

Posted January 31, 2014

Though ewbewdi, I think there was only one batch made, so at some stage, you will need to give up.

Brother PorkChop reckons...

Posted January 31, 2014

I couldn't find any either. Even after the manager at the EH promised to call me when it came in although they knewe nothing about it. I am actually quite partial to a six pack of Sam Adams every once in a while although the Sierra Nevada range is nice. Tonight, its Sundowner Ales.

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Lulu reckons...

Posted January 31, 2014

"When I’m in church I am Greek, surrounded by Greeks and ensconced in a culture that has flourished quietly for 2,000 years"

Professor, have you been to Melbourne? Because I know a lot of people here who'd identify with that as well. And I can remember Andrew Bolt whinging 10 or so years ago about people who are Australian-born but still identify as Greek/Italian etc and OMG insist on supporting those soccer teams. I have no idea why he was so offended by the grown men who cried in the streets when the Azurri lost (again) or the other grown men whose joy turned to shirtlessness in the street when Greece won the Euro Cup.

NBlob would have you know...

Posted January 31, 2014

Thank you Mr Stirling for reminding us that there are real differences between an actual asshat, one that dons an ass for a hat for camouflage, and those that may appear to be wearing ass-like hats by virtue of the extreme range from which they are viewed.

Culture & society are real things, despite Reagan & Thatcher attempting to wish them away. Culture is taken up with mothers milk and like calcium 45 gets deep down in your bones and colours the way one perceives the world. Not all cultures are equal. Those that venerate peace & respect are far more attractive to me than the Warlike and aggressive. It is an unfortunate by-product of history that many of the peacefull cultures have been enslaved & conquered by the warlike. This isn't some Hippy dippy golden era revisionism, for examples consider the Balinese and the pre-whitey Fijians.

There are some very interesting studies being published about the Multi-generational effects of trauma. Some are over near the long haired sociologists, others in the domain of the hard-minded epidemiologists. It is real. It is tangible. It ripples & echoes on down through the generations. Perhaps the most obvious is the children of Some Veterans, raised by violent men with substance issues, or worse orphaned by war, are you honestly suggesting that doesn't impact the developing child's mind? Or poverty? Or illiteracy?

So Mr Stirling, with gritted teeth, I'd urge you to hang up your hat, look past your upbringing and consider how your life may have been different without the benefits of regular meals, relative peace, an absence of multigenerational poverty, racially motivated discrimination, access to books... And don't you dare, even for a moment, claim the "we was dirt poor" angle. Compared to the son of an Aboriginal on an out-station, an itinerant undocumented Latino farm hand, or an African American in the badlands of Detroit, even a poor white farmer's boy relatively speaking had rubies falling out his ass.

I doubt you can, as one of the hallmarks of the truly ass-hatted is the inability to think " There but for the grace of Dog go I." The other is the selective reading of Their holy text to disregard all that Commo nonsense about your fellow man & leap straight to the "I'm better off than him, so Dog favours me more."

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted January 31, 2014

Lulu - I've been to Melbourne twice and felt very much at home each time I visited. The first time I traveled there I immediately met up with some Burgers (Guru Bob, Bangar, Nautilus) for a quick pint before dinner. There at the bar reading a book was what I immediately recognized as a young lady of Greek ancestry - practically stereotypical Greek features. We spoke a little Greek; she showed me the tatoo on her arm - Medusa the Gorgon. Ah.... my People.

Melbourne has an enormous Greek community. And Italian. And Chinese. And Indian. And Muslim. And on and on and on. Even a lovely Bohemian enclave in St. Kilda that reminded me of Venice Beach, California. I've never seen a more ethnically diverse city. I loved it there. Oh yeah, and - bar none - the best dim sum (you refer to it as yum cha) I've ever eaten.

w from brisbane would have you know...

Posted January 31, 2014

And, I heard Herman Wouk say, very sincerely, that he thought Melbourne had a more vibrant Jewish community than New York City.

While we must face squarely our community's failings, we must also face squarely all the good stuff that has happened.

I remember hearing an anecdote from one of the Dunera boys. The shipload of German Jewish internees that Australia accepted from Britain. They were interned in camps in rural Australia during WW2. One of the Dunera boys said, he already knew what was happening in Germany, now being marched along a rural road by armed soldiers in Australia was quite terrifying. But then he knew everything was going to be OK.
Because one of the Australian soldiers walked up to him, handed him his rifle, and said "Hold on to this for a minute wouldya mate? I've got to have a piss."

Dino not to be confused with would have you know...

Posted January 31, 2014

My Uncle came to Australia in the 50's (I think) and laments the cuisine at the time. He's claimed there were no fkn potatoes in Australia at the time but maybe he is embellishing.

He grew up on a farm and I have been there and they eat good.

His recollection of the first few months in Melbourne(starry gazed) of severe pain was alleviated by some Jewish Bloke in Melbourne that sold Gerkins.

Yep.

Gerkins saved my Uncles life.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan reckons...

Posted January 31, 2014

You people are killing me here. It is the ethnic warmth, the freedom to be, that makes me yearn for Melbourne. But it is more than just "multicultural" - Melbourne is, in my experience, socio-economically unique. The public transit, the trams, were an amazing experience. Everyone rode them at the same time, different classes casually intermingling - bankers in business suits standing or sitting next to more common, much less affluent folk. That doesn't happen here.

Give me a plate of simple pasta and a world class shot of espresso at Pellegrini's. Let me slowly stroll the Queen Vic to argue with Turkish Cypriot shellfish vendors who won't do business with Americans. Take me to the Victoria Library to stand inches from Ned Kelly's actual armour. Allow me to see the entire city from the top of the Eureka Tower.

Τον επ?μενο χρ?νο στη Μελβο?ρνη.

damian ducks in to say...

Posted January 31, 2014

There's good yum cha in Sydney and Brisbane too :). But I learned to know it, love it and expect it as a damned essential hallmark of civilisation in Melbourne.

Oh and as a teenager in Sydeny after school I'd walk all the way into the city to visit the Russian place in Centrepoint Plaza that had these great piroshki. Then there was the Ceylonese/African fusion place on Oxford St called Afrilanka... even the dessert ice cream had chili in it. And I mentioned being able to find really good lamb souvlaki almost anywhere? I pulled into a side street in Coonabarrabran on the way from Canberra to Brisbane one time, found a cafe that had the salad bar of the ubiquitous kebab shop set up... so I walked in and asked for a kebab. The lady said "we don't have that sheet, we are Greek". So I ordered a souvlaki and it was a pretty good one too. There isn't a decent sized town in Aus where you won't be able to find a decent Singapore noodle or char-kway-tao, or burritos, or paella...

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan would have you know...

Posted January 31, 2014

Et tu, Damian? You're killing me here.

Bangar mumbles...

Posted January 31, 2014

Melbourne would be greater for you and your family's presence mate.

Dino not to be confused with mutters...

Posted January 31, 2014

Fuck Melbourne

Set up shop on King Georges Road at Bexley in Sydney.

There were Greeks there that did a Lamb Souvlaki to die for.

To fkn Die for!

I think it was Sumac or Smokded Parika but the thing I don't like about Greeks is they close shop(like I went there 10 years later and there gone!!!!!) and don't tell ya wehere they're goin!

damian ducks in to say...

Posted January 31, 2014

You know I'd be amazed to learn that the Bay Area, LA and all in between didn't have all this and more. I mean, the nearest good wine region to Bris (the "granite belt") has a few nice reds, but you're right next to the friggin' Napa Valley, aren't you?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan asserts...

Posted February 1, 2014

The grass is always greener in a different hemisphere.

damian puts forth...

Posted February 1, 2014

That's very true. And it's an interesting point from the perspective of the original topic, too.

The way that European settlement in Australia was positioned from the point of view of the British and its successor legal systems was predicated on the idea of terra nullius, that there was no-one with existing jurisdiction or title over the land. However the lived experience of settlement was of a war: first a frontier war, then a war of occupation and finally an eradication of resistance. The many Peninsula War veterans who ended up down here recognised and respected the guerilla tactics of resisting groups, even referred to them in those terms. This went on for a little over 100 years.

The trouble with this is that the modern conservative view is of Aboriginal resistance as essentially rebellion or criminal conduct. It ignores the well documented views of most people in the 19th century that there was a real frontier war that lasted the entire century.

There's a growing militarisation of Australian history. The fact that we achieved independent nationhood in 1901 without bloodshed is apparently a bit embarrassing, as is the fact we led the world in social reforms through the late 19th and early 20th ceturies (we fell back a bit after 1950, gained a bit in the 70s and 80s, then fell back again). Apparently participation in a stupid campaign masterminded by the fuckwit Churchill in 1915 outweighs all that. So it's compulsory to revere the ones who got themselves blown up -- though when I was in school the only worthwhile story from that episode seemed to be Simpson and his donkey.

The point here is that we have a more or less compulsory reverence to accord a few white boys who went overseas to die on behalf of the UK, while we are not apparently even permitted to acknowledge the black warriors who died defending the country as it was then. As it happens many of the individuals are known, and there's a lot of evidence and documentation about individual acts of courage and sacrifice. There's a nascent movement that will inevitably prevail, insisting the Australian War Memorial should acknowledge these people. All this stuff about how successful we are at multi-culturalism may be a bit stretched till we've resolved that.

Dino not to be confused with reckons...

Posted February 1, 2014

Damien,

I learnt a little about the Native Population of Australia during school years of the 70's.

Little.

It's a cliche but I know more about American Natives. Tribes, customs etc thanks to TV and John Wayne.

There was that one iconic 1960's film 'Jemma'(?).

You know the one that had Aborigines in it.

Technicolour.

I don't know what they are teaching in schools these days but a reduction in propaganda would be welcome.

NBlob mutters...

Posted February 2, 2014

Dino. I have a couple of dodgy Kiwi mates & we have compared notes on how the history of the Maori wars are treated VS the Aboriginal Resistance wars in Australia. Absolutely fascinating.

By my understanding (very limited, Im not aprofessional historian) 3 key differences: the Maori wars were a Declared Action with an official title, whereas the dispossession of the Murri & Koori was just sort of a simmering police action. The Maori wars had an End - a treaty - a cessation of hostilities, not here. & finally the Kiwi nation in the late 80's saw value in recognising their 1st peoples.

Worth a separate Blog while The Scribe is on deadline& fiddling his shiny.

NBlob mutters...

Posted February 2, 2014

Re: my reply to Mr Stirling on Friday.

Nice Hat, chickenshit.

Dino not to be confused with puts forth...

Posted February 2, 2014

NBlob,

Apparently(I read this the other day and loved it!) "The Land of the Wrong White Crowd" , Kiwiville(and dat bird is just a shruken no good emu according to the latest genetic information) as we know it or Bondi East as they like to refer to themselves, is not in fact 'New' at all!

Where the Fuck is the old Zealand?

My interconnected electronic device is stumped!

Dino not to be confused with is gonna tell you...

Posted February 2, 2014

And as For 'Straylya'.

CF Amerigo?

HTF does that work?

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted February 2, 2014

There is a Zealand in Holland. Abel Tasman was Dutch - and a nortorious lady's man.

Dino not to be confused with mutters...

Posted February 2, 2014

Maybe He's our Father Paul?

damian mutters...

Posted February 2, 2014

The continent now referred to as Australia was once known as New Holland. Though I believe it has had other names going back quite a bit further, outside Eurotrash history.

damian ducks in to say...

Posted February 2, 2014

NBlob, I have to admit I am guilty of not following my own advice and best instincts about not feeding the troll (do as I say not as I do, etc). But you're poking it with a stick.

Not that there's anything wrong with that, good job that man, carry on and tally ho and all that.

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w from brisbane reckons...

Posted January 31, 2014

Getting back to Muntstitutional Conarchys.
Elsewhere, JB has reported his pleasure at picking up the new Cliff Hardy novel. While looking up the latest one, I noticed this as part of the general Cliff Hardy blurb.

Cliff Hardy "has a love-hate relationship with his time and place. He embraces the best aspects of Australian life - the tolerance, the classlessness, the vigorous urban and rural culture - while despising the greed and the conservatism that are constantly threatening to undercut what he sees as 'real Australia'."

That sums it up for a lot of us, I think.

Paul_Nicholas_Boylan swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted January 31, 2014

We have digressed from the topic a bit, havent't we?

damian would have you know...

Posted February 1, 2014

In 1987 I read all of Peter Corris' Cliff Hardy novels as up to that date... including one that got made into a movie afterward. I gather there have been a lot since then, and I would dearly love to catch up. Maybe that's my project after Alastair Reynolds (just finished Blue Remembered Earth, about to start the next).

I would say I am a Cliff Hardy fan. I like crime writing in general and I'm probably (to be honest) more likely to try that than SF. But we'll see. Got to read a bit of that Peter Temple chap too...

damian mutters...

Posted February 1, 2014

BTW I recall talking about reading Chasm City and thinking it was an early work, and I would like to see stuff later in his career... Blue Remembered Earth is a great piece of writing from a quality author at the top of his game. Looking forward to the next.

Lulu ducks in to say...

Posted February 3, 2014

damian - Peter Temple does a great picture of some of Melbourne's quirks, particularly the football obsession/tribalism.

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