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Book launch. Talking Smack. Now with Extract.

Posted August 22, 2014 into Books by John Birmingham

UPDATED. See entry below for extract.

Took a few hours off deadline last night to launch Andrew McMillen's 'Talking Smack', a series of profile/interviews with musicians forcussed largely, but not entirely on drug use.

A fascinating book, expertly done. (It even has it's own little website here. Super Pro!) Andrew's one of the best freelancers working the magazine trade at the moment. The Mick Harvey (Bad Seeds, Birthday Party) chapter below is one of the highlights. It details with equisite discomfort just how much damage a user can do to those around them who aren't using.

This is longish chat, 30+ mins, probably best appreciated of an evening with a few drinks in you.

14 Responses to ‘Book launch. Talking Smack. Now with Extract.’

Barnesm swirls their brandy and claims...

Posted August 22, 2014
Did the lighting guy have any trouble with the brightness levels in the film? I was getting a lot of head flare while I watched.

John Birmingham has opinions thus...

Posted August 22, 2014
There was a lighting guy?

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Therbs puts forth...

Posted August 22, 2014
Id buy it but it has Gotye listed on the front cover and the only smack he deserves is a close fisted one in the face.

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Paul_Nicholas_Boylan mutters...

Posted August 22, 2014
This affirms and validates my decision to forgo and not pursue rock music stardom.

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insomniac would have you know...

Posted August 22, 2014
not enough drugs in it for you?

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Halwes mutters...

Posted August 22, 2014

I just got off a long plane trip through many domestic airports in Aus including Cairns and Brissie. The first thing that struck me is what a police state we've become with feds and dogs everywhere but secondly, when I browsed the airport bookshops, there were no Queensland authors represented. I asked at every bookshop for copies of your books and Xavier Herbert and Frank Hardy and there was nothing except blank stares. Sure I berated them on the lack of aussie content but surely there should be a copy of Felafel there somewhere at least ( it's a scream at any age) especially in the Qld shops. Leviathan would also be good reading for a tourist that wanted to learn something of the country. I also expected your sci fi novels to be represented so I could give them a try but not a chance.

John Birmingham ducks in to say...

Posted August 22, 2014
Yeah, airports don't stock a lot of backlist these days.

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w from brisbane would have you know...

Posted August 22, 2014
Nice interview. Your son is using the pen name, Andrew McMillen. :)


Dino not to be confused with asserts...

Posted August 22, 2014
Mini me?

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NBlob would have you know...

Posted August 22, 2014
I have nothing to add, it is a topic with which I am entirely unfamiliar.

Then a monkey flew out of my ass.

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Halwes ducks in to say...

Posted August 22, 2014

Remember when everyone thought hammer was the worst drug ever. I always found opium fairly enjoyable, until you stopped for a few days. Looking at the destructive qualities of methamphetamines and Kronic etc I think that the war on drugs might have been a waste of time. What has happened is that we have such draconian prohibition now on grass and other "mainstream drugs" that our current generation, which is pretty intelligent as a collective, have decided to make their own drugs. From what I've seen of it this is an unfolding disaster.

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pi puts forth...

Posted August 22, 2014
Drugs are like all things... good for some, bad for others. Nothing is ever good if done to excess for any length of time. Great story in the thread below.

The big issue always, with any destructive behaviour, is how do you get out of it. When all of your friends are part of the same destructive pattern, it generally takes disaster to shake people out of it. For me, I've partaken plenty of things, but I've always had a career, and other things that suck out my time, and for enjoyable reasons (key point... it's a math thing). When you don't have those pursuits, when you are with the same people, day-in, day-out, the biggest challenge to drug use is boredom.

'tis always been thus. People start doing these things because they're fun. They don't stop, because there's nothing they've found that's more fun. When they do, the problem goes away. If they don't, it leads to a lot of unhappiness.

'cept for the people that should never ever do drugs. For them, it's just sad.

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Rob asserts...

Posted August 25, 2014

I've been arguing with one of my friends on FB lately. They keep posting all this horrible liberal crap about drug users and drug use. The main theme seems to that drug users are victims, with special needs and they all have been dealing with sad issues in their lives, that need blunting by drugs. I always thought that drugs are popular because they are fun and everyone loves a good time. You could drink 3 litres of wine, or shoot heroin, or smoke a cigarette. All varying degrees of fun.

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